Category: Marketing, Strategy & Fishing

Musings on the passions that drive marketing/strategy and fishing. Saltwater vs fresh. Fly casting vs conventional. . . it’s all good. So long as one is passionate about the pursuit.

25 Apr 2011

Are You Ready for Your Close Up?

Video is a great way to communicate to your target audience. A well-produced professional piece can not only convey your brand and message in an entertaining and engaging way, but it can also drive visitors to your video and brand thanks to Google’s search engines thorough indexing of YouTube videos.

At bloomfield knoble, we’ve been producing promotional and informational videos for our clients for years.

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21 Jan 2011

How Not To Waste Money on Direct Mail

What do you want to accomplish with your direct mail campaign? I doubt anybody answered, “For it to get thrown in the trash as soon as it’s picked out of the mailbox.” Or, “To spend a lot of money on a really nice mailer and send it out, only to guess a few months later its impact with our customers.” Worst of all, “To create one piece and mail it to a set of ZIP codes that we chose after looking at a map for five minutes.”

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15 Nov 2010

Neuroscience 2010 Highlights

We’ve written about neuroscience and marketing, but it seems that there’s suddenly become a real push – as if neuromarketing is right on the verge of becoming the next big thing in advertising.  Even the New York Times had a feature article this past Sunday.  As such, it seemed like a good idea to dig a little deeper and find out where research in this field is heading.  Fortunately, the Society for Neuroscience’s annual meeting was being held from November 13-17 in San Diego.  This event is expected to draw of 30,000 people to hear some of the field’s most cutting-edge ideas.

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27 Sep 2010

Braess's Paradox and Experiential Marketing

People waiting in line
Opening another register won't help.

Braess’s paradox states that adding extra capacity to a network, when the moving entities selfishly choose their route, can in some cases reduce overall performance.  This is because the Nash equilibrium of such a system is not necessarily optimal.  The paradox has generally been applied to traffic, but more and more agencies are finding that that the paradox can also be applied to social gatherings as well.

Formulated in 1968 by Dietrich Braess, the paradox is not a true paradox, but rather a counter-intuitive finding regarding an everyday situation.  The concept was that in an urban area with a lot of traffic, adding a new road to distribute the traffic may seem like a sensible idea, but just the opposite occurs – a new route added in a transportation network increases the travel times of all individual travelers.

(more…)

27 Sep 2010

Braess’s Paradox and Experiential Marketing

People waiting in line
Opening another register won't help.

Braess’s paradox states that adding extra capacity to a network, when the moving entities selfishly choose their route, can in some cases reduce overall performance.  This is because the Nash equilibrium of such a system is not necessarily optimal.  The paradox has generally been applied to traffic, but more and more agencies are finding that that the paradox can also be applied to social gatherings as well.

Formulated in 1968 by Dietrich Braess, the paradox is not a true paradox, but rather a counter-intuitive finding regarding an everyday situation.  The concept was that in an urban area with a lot of traffic, adding a new road to distribute the traffic may seem like a sensible idea, but just the opposite occurs – a new route added in a transportation network increases the travel times of all individual travelers.

(more…)

21 Sep 2010

The relevancy of understanding the client’s viewpoint

I am a big believer in communication.  I’m not writing about marketing/advertising when I make this first reference. I am writing about in life, in general, in everything. Too often, too much is left unsaid. Or, like a young

bloomfield knoble philosophy
No fear of questions in this room.

child afraid to ask questions in front of peers, we leave too much un-asked. The point is, we all do too much guesswork. Bottom line, if you have a question, ask it. If you have something to say, say it. Otherwise, you are just frustrated.

For myself, romantic movies could all be easily cut to one-quarter length of screened run time. In most cases, the actor playing the romantic fool often is afraid to ask for or share his feelings. It goes something like this: “I . . . I  . . . I just don’t know what to say to her.” Gag. The actress playing the pursued role is always just waiting to see “who he really is inside. . . he just can’t show it.” (Double gag) I just want to scream in the first 15 minutes, “Tell each other how you feel and what you want and let’s get this thing over with.” Can you tell I like Comedies, historical and sci-f (more…)

21 Sep 2010

The relevancy of understanding the client's viewpoint

I am a big believer in communication.  I’m not writing about marketing/advertising when I make this first reference. I am writing about in life, in general, in everything. Too often, too much is left unsaid. Or, like a young

bloomfield knoble philosophy
No fear of questions in this room.

child afraid to ask questions in front of peers, we leave too much un-asked. The point is, we all do too much guesswork. Bottom line, if you have a question, ask it. If you have something to say, say it. Otherwise, you are just frustrated.

For myself, romantic movies could all be easily cut to one-quarter length of screened run time. In most cases, the actor playing the romantic fool often is afraid to ask for or share his feelings. It goes something like this: “I . . . I  . . . I just don’t know what to say to her.” Gag. The actress playing the pursued role is always just waiting to see “who he really is inside. . . he just can’t show it.” (Double gag) I just want to scream in the first 15 minutes, “Tell each other how you feel and what you want and let’s get this thing over with.” Can you tell I like Comedies, historical and sci-f (more…)

30 Aug 2010

A consumer website that really makes a dent in the housing crisis?

This article found on HousingWatch.com is the basis for the blog below — http://www.housingwatch.com/2010/08/27/fannie-mae-wants-you-to-knowyouroptions-com/

A recent pro

knowyouroptions.com
Click to visit

ject bloomfield knoble provided for Fannie Mae was the KnowYourOptions.com website and communication campaign. This effort includes internal and external marketing material for every viable channel. The intent, after careful thought and planning, was to develop a communication platform that informs borrowers that face the risk of foreclosure exactly what their options are in today’s market. Sounds simple, but it was not an easy task by any means. One of the most critical factors in the breakdown of the housing market has been lack of communication. As I explained to my son the other day, as we discussed how best to manage difficulty with a subject in school, “If you are not in communication with your teacher about struggling with the work, (more…)

24 Aug 2010

Is 'fishing' a good metaphor for marketing?

Fishing where the fish are pays off

Many times we have made a simple statement when discussing how to approach marketing planning with a new client: “When you go fishing, it is best to fish where the fish are.” Seems like a no-brainer. So how about we take the metaphor further in approaching planning to marketing?

What this metaphor will illustrate is the difference between just throwing out something to get numbers of respondents — regardless to qualifications — compared to focusing on reaching qualified respondents that are interested in the offer because they are your target market. In other words, fishing where the fish are. In the first example, you don’t know or care if they are a potential customer. You are just glad to put them into your response rate report and hope a (more…)

24 Aug 2010

Is ‘fishing’ a good metaphor for marketing?

Fishing where the fish are pays off

Many times we have made a simple statement when discussing how to approach marketing planning with a new client: “When you go fishing, it is best to fish where the fish are.” Seems like a no-brainer. So how about we take the metaphor further in approaching planning to marketing?

What this metaphor will illustrate is the difference between just throwing out something to get numbers of respondents — regardless to qualifications — compared to focusing on reaching qualified respondents that are interested in the offer because they are your target market. In other words, fishing where the fish are. In the first example, you don’t know or care if they are a potential customer. You are just glad to put them into your response rate report and hope a (more…)