Category: Social Media

12 Mar 2019
memes_blog

It’s a Meme World Out There

buzz

Buzz has it right, memes are everywhere. I go on Facebook and what’s the first thing I see on my timeline? A meme. I open up Instagram and the first three posts in my feed are memes. (I say that like I don’t enjoy it – but I actually do.) In fact, it seems like I go on social media more nowadays to get a laugh at all the memes on my feed, rather than to see what all my “friends” are up to. But I digress.

According to the Oxford Dictionary, a meme is “An image, video, piece of text, etc., typically humorous in nature, that is copied and spread rapidly by Internet users, often with slight variations.” Richard Dawkins first coined the term “meme” in 1976 to describe a trait passed “from one individual to another by imitation or other non-genetic means.” Anyone who has spent some time on the Internet could probably point out a meme.

grandma

…Ok, maybe not.

As a millennial interacting with a brand, I am more likely to stop and look at a meme or image than I am to watch a video, sign-up for something, or read a blog (ironic, considering this is a blog — thanks for reading). Memes are low investment, don’t take a lot of time to read or process, and, in a world where time is more valuable than ever, that is appealing.

 

Why do memes resonate with younger audiences?

      1. Memes are relatable.

One of the main reasons millennials like memes so much is because they are so relatable. They poke fun at clichés, current events, and the not-so-pleasant realities we all face every day. We connect with or relate to the meme on some level, which is why we laugh, share and feel the desire to show all our friends.

meme1

meme2 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Memes are relevant.

Memes are trendy. The internet loves them, and so do we. As consumers, we gravitate towards what is current and applicable to our culture. This is why memes go viral — they are contemporary, and we like poking fun at relevant themes and issues. And who doesn’t love being “in” on an inside joke?

Know what I meme…? 😉

meme3

3. Memes are familiar.

When I look at a meme, three things can happen; I think it’s funny and laugh, get confused because I don’t understand it, or simply not think it’s funny and go back to my endless scrolling. In any case, I took the time to stop and read the meme, because the content is familiar to me. I already know that this image is something that could potentially entertain me and make me laugh, so I take the time to look at it. For example, who doesn’t know about Grumpy Cat?

meme5

 

So the question lies: Should memes be used in your social media marketing strategy?

Consider your audience.

If you’re trying to reach younger audiences, showing your company’s relevance and humor through memes might bode well for you. We already know millennials love trends and we like to see the brands we follow staying current as well. On the other hand, memes are usually packed with sarcasm and irony. Many non-millennials may not find this humorous or appealing. Meme humor can often come across distasteful, which can turn some people off to your brand.

One example of a brand that has done this well is Glossier. Glossier is a beauty company that targets millennials. They know their audience, and they apply their own relevant content around makeup and skincare to tie the meme back to their brand.

Consider your brand.

What tone of voice does your brand normally speak? A brand that is playful and sarcastic could benefit from sharing memes. A more serious, corporate brand might just confuse their audience with a meme, either by the impudent humor or the unfamiliarity of the content compared to typical posts by the brand.

Look at Barkbox. They have capitalized on their lighthearted tone of voice on their social media to show they are approachable and relevant. In fact, I don’t even use Barkbox (nor do I have a dog) and I gave them a follow because I got a laugh out of their content. That’s a win.

Consider the meme.

Before posting a meme, you should also make sure you have interpreted it accurately. Because of the satirical undertones of many memes, you should double check that the meme you’re sharing is appropriate for the message of your brand. Memes can quickly become inappropriate and offensive when not shared in the right context. Know Your Meme explains the meanings of many popular memes so you can always know what your meme is talking about before you post it.

When deciding whether memes are something you should add to your brand’s social media strategy consider your audience, your brand, and the meme itself. Doing so will save you time, credibility, and possibly even embarrassment. Focus on crafting the best strategy for your brand, rather than just hopping on the next social media trend hoping for results.


About the Author

Breanne Avedikian is a Junior Art Director and Graphic Designer at bloomfield knoble. She focuses on layout and print design and maintains visual brand consistency for our clients. A Starbucks addict and California native, you can find her watching movies, listening to country music or petting the dog at the party. And just ask her how much she loves Texas!

Connect with Breanne Avedikian
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

15 Jan 2019
being-heard-on-twitter_tom-blog_copy_blog

Just How Loud Do You Have to Scream to Be Heard on Twitter?

I’ve decided that I hate social media. I’ve joined neither Facebook nor Snap. I am on Instagram, but only to share vacation pictures with my family because I’m too lazy to sort and share photos with them after my trips. I gave up on LinkedIn because I find the timeline poorly designed and I’m not looking for a job anyway. I also stopped reading (and generally writing) blogs because I don’t care and don’t think other people do either. So, if someone besides the Director of Communication for bloomfield knoble is reading this, you have my permission to bail out now.

Well, if you’re actually still reading, then I have to admit that I used to really be into Twitter. I mean really into Twitter. I would post all day — use hashtags, join conversations, try to influence conversations (for or against depending on the topic) and more often than not, complain about some injustice against me (real or perceived). At one point I had nearly 100,000 followers.

And then a funny thing happened. I got bored. I’ve already shared with you that I’m quite lazy, so it didn’t take long for the novelty of Twitter to subside. I went from Tweeting a lot to now-and-then and then that became infrequently until it was pretty much never. I lost nearly all of my subscribers but honestly didn’t care. Most of my friends had given up on Twitter too – either also moving away from social networks in general or moving to a different platform. As such, I simply let it fade from memory and forgot about it.

Until recently, when I got really mad at my pest control company for a real (not perceived) injustice. I was so mad that I hopped on Twitter just to vent my frustration and (in my imaginary world) start a movement among the masses that had also been wronged by said company. Together our voices would force change as our postings became a trending topic which would go viral and then spread across different media and social networks. Satisfaction would be rendered. Justice would be mine!

Except, of course, none of that happened. No one joined the conversation – not one like or reply or retweet – not even from the brand itself as I’m not sure they even monitored their unverified account anyway.

I wasn’t surprised that my Tweets got no traction – I have few followers now – many of whom I suspect are inactive as well – and although I structured the posts properly (tagging the brand, using a hashtag) it’s just background noise in today’s world of political topic-driven social media. However, as a Behavioral Economist, I was interested in just what I would have to do to be heard on Twitter.

As an advertising agency, we at bloomfield knoble have been chasing the dream of going viral forever, but no amount of math or predictive analytics can really account for the irrationality of humans. Nevertheless, I was curious about how to measure – beyond the analytics Twitter provides – how one could analyze impact on a social network. A bit of research and some investigating later, I came across an excellent paper in the Journal of Physics by Natya Taniarza, Adiwijaya and Warih Maharani at the School of Computing, Telkom University, Bandung, Indonesia. Their paper, Social network analysis using k-Path centrality method, gave me some great insight into why my Tweets (in particular) don’t matter.

Here’s the abstract to their paper:

“k-Path centrality is deemed as one of the effective methods to be applied in centrality measurement in which the influential node is estimated as the node that is being passed by information path frequently. Regarding this, k-Path centrality has been employed in the analysis of this paper specifically by adapting random-algorithm approach in order to: (1) determine the influential user’s ranking in social media Twitter; and (2) ascertain the influence of parameter ain the numeration of k-Path centrality. According to the analysis, the findings showed that the method of k-Path centrality with random-algorithm approach can be used to determine user’s ranking which influences in the dissemination of information in Twitter. Furthermore, the findings also showed that parameter influenced the duration and the ranking results: the less the avalue, the longer the duration, yet the ranking results were more stable.”

The paper is worth reading and I’m not going to do justice to their research, but here’s the bottom-line – specifically as it impacts me. Basically, a person needs a lot of followers (which I don’t have anymore) or needs to wield influence in a group (node) of people who are likely to participate in the conversation – or are also connected in different groups where they wield influence.

It’s like the gossip game. If I have a small group of friends, but they have no friends, then even though I shared – our little circle is as far as it goes. However, if one of my friends is in another circle of friends – and that person tells that circle – and someone in that circle tells another circle – pretty soon a lot of people have heard. This is actually common-sense in a way. Anyone that has ever been on social media gets how this works. It’s not the process that can be hard to understand – it’s the measurement.

The big buzzword for the past couple of years has been “influencer marketing.” Brands know they need to have an influencer but understanding who – and how much to spend – and what the return-on-investment could be – is a vital part of marketing. Understanding that influence doesn’t move in a straight-line and utilizing the learning in Taniarza’s paper may be an important factor in projecting success.

Anyway, all the math showed me was that no one cared that I was whining about my pest control company, so I gave up on my dream of Twitter vengeance and decided to vent my frustration against their company by firing them – convinced that the $29 per month they were losing would cripple their business economy. Yeah, that’ll show ‘em! Who’s with me?

#Vivalarevolucion

Sources:

Taniarza N., Maharani A., Maharani W. Social network analysis using k-Path centrality method. IOP Publishing: International Conference on Data and Information Science. IOP Conf. Series: Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 971 (2018) 012015. dos: 10.1088/1742-6596/971/1/012015. (Natya Taniarza et al 2018 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser 971 012015)

 


About the Author

thomas-thompson-headshot

A STEM (Science / Technology / Engineering / Math) graduate and COO of bloomfield knoble, Thomas exemplifies the view that advertising is becoming an engineering discipline. He leads the integrated insights and strategic planning group in a way consistent with bloomfield knoble’s goal of bringing a strong analytical foundation to uncover fresh and innovative insights and business opportunities.
Connect with Thomas Thompson
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

15 Jan 2017

Caveat Empclicktwittor

The same machines that help us better target can also hurt us.

Caveat Empclicktwittor is me pretending I remember anything from high school Latin class, but I’m going to loosely translate it as, “beware what you click on Twitter” because it turns out that the same machines that help us better target customers can also hurt us. Nevertheless, I love Twitter. It’s my favorite social media platform. Admittedly, it’s the only social media platform I use, so I may be a bit prejudiced, but fortunately I’m not the “social media person” here at bloomfield knoble, so I don’t have to use any others.

One of my favorite things to do on Twitter is to craft tweets that will generate engagement (likes, retweets, comments, etc.). I get a rush every time I see that little dot next to the Twitter logo on my iPhone. It’s not exactly an obsession, but I will admit that I have annoyed Jeff Carrington, who is the “social media person” here at bloomfield knoble, a bunch of times to learn best practices and methods that improve my chances of generating engagement. However, I know I’m not obsessed, because I don’t troll and I don’t (usually) tweet at autoresponders. I love interacting with people on Twitter and having conversations at 140 characters with people I don’t know perfectly fits my generally anti-social behavior. So if you’re tweeting to me, or even just about a topic I like, it’s not unusual for me to jump in.

Unfortunately, that may be about to change.

I didn’t grow up with social media, but I understand it. I know how to spot clickbait and phishing, where crooks try to trick people into clicking links to malware or sites that steal personal information, is common on Twitter. So as much as I love seeing that dot on my iPhone, I know better than to fall for the obvious. Or, I did. According to Sally Adee, writing in NewScientist, a machine learning system that reads our past tweets to craft personalized traps could make clicking links that show up in my Twitter feed even riskier.

Some criminals take the trouble to tailor their phishing tweets to specific individuals by hand – known as spearphishing. For example, (and it’s been suspended, so I don’t feel like I’m helping out the enemy here), @NatWest_HelpTC was a scam account that responded to anyone tweeting a customer service question at NatWest Bank’s real Twitter account. The imposters direct users to a fake NatWest site in an attempt to harvest bank login details. Success rates for spearphishing are estimated to be around 45%, but it’s also time consuming. Banks shouldn’t count on the difficulty of phishing protecting their customer though – researchers at Baltimore security company Zerofox have shown that spearphishing can be done automatically.

By mining people’s past Twitter activity, their mating learning system first hunts down a target. It looks for high-profile or well-connected users – such as those who list a job title like recruiter or CEO in their profile – and people who are particularly active. Zerofox’s Philip Tully says they also targeted people by looking at the hashtags they used in their tweets, as well as what the person likes to retweet and the times they are most likely to be using Twitter. Using this information, the algorithm generates tweets that the individual is likely to click on – and behold, personalized clickbait.

The team tested the system on 90 people and managed to trick more than two-thirds of them into clicking the link. The team thinks that the approach could reach far more people with a greater success rate than handcrafted approaches. They also say the system would work on other social media sites, including Facebook. the work was presented at the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas last month. But it’s not just about clicks. A recent study from Columbia University found that 60% of people don’t click or read the links they retweet. Tully says that’s a boon for the technique his team is warning about – no look retweeters are effectively laundering the scam tweets, giving them a sense of legitimacy and making it more likely that others will click.

Avoiding the trap isn’t always easy, but keep your operating system up-to-date; have a virus-protection program running on your system, and – especially if you are reaching out to customer service – only click on links offered from the verified account. As an agency heavily involved in social media advertising, we are very careful to avoid content that sounds like clickbait. While we would love to get a 45% success rate, we try to mitigate the potential fury of customers on social media that fall for scams. Unfortunately, like in the case of NatWest, it’s hard and spearphishing attacks have plagued them – and others – as long as Twitter has been around.

 


About the Author

thomas-thompson-headshot

A STEM (Science / Technology / Engineering / Math) graduate and COO of bloomfield knoble, Thomas exemplifies the view that advertising is becoming an engineering discipline. He leads the integrated insights and strategic planning group in a way consistent with bloomfield knoble’s goal of bringing a strong analytical foundation to uncover fresh and innovative insights and business opportunities.
Connect with Thomas Thompson
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

 


Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

09 Jun 2016

Taking the ‘Insta’ Out of Instagram

Instagram’sInstagram Not So Insta Anymore not so “instant” any more. Soon, if not already, your Instagram newsfeed will become scrambled – out of chronological order – based on your interactions on the photo-sharing platform.

As announced in March, starting soon, the posts you see will be determined by Instagram’s new algorithm, which takes into account which users you’ve Liked, Shared or Commented on.

Some Instagrammers are up in arms, even before the feature gets its wide release. Users have become accustomed to scrolling through a literal timeline, liking, sharing and commenting along the way, to the first image they recognize from their last session, thus knowing that they’ve seen all the posts from the people they follow.

Brands, worried that their organic posts will no longer be seen by users who don’t scroll down far enough, have encouraged users to turn on notifications. That’s a clunky solution because nobody wants to get a notification every time a brand posts something.

To wit: In the ramp up to Star Wars: The Force Awakens, I got caught up in the frenzy and turned on notifications for posts from the official Star Wars Instagram account. That didn’t last long. I was soon being driven crazy by alerts (especially since they show up on my watch), reaching a crescendo on the night of the red carpet premier. This is sort of a big deal because it’s me. And Star Wars. There’s no greater love between human and brand than between me and Star Wars.

So, no – the solution is not to turn on alerts so you don’t miss a brand’s Insta post. Instagram’s numbers show that posts in newsfeeds that have the algorithm turned on have seen higher engagements. But, of course, those users are being served posts from other users with whom they’ve already had interactions, or tend to interact with more. Which is  the way this is supposed to work.

This change means that Instagram is no longer the even playing field it used to be. I’ll no longer see posts from Star Wars and Mikael Jorgensen (Wilco keyboardist and amateur photographer) alongside that guy who I’ve forgotten why I followed ages ago. His (very) occasional gems will be buried further down.

Facebook and Twitter have already long ago implemented similar algorithms to serve up content that those platforms think you want to see. The lesson we learned from those changes is the lesson we will have to learn from Instagram’s change:

Content Matters

Develop better content for the platform and you’ll have more interactions on your post. Then you’ll be served up higher in followers’ newsfeeds. This applies to individuals who want the ego boost of more likes and shares, but it more importantly applies to brands who need to up their game to stay relevant to their followers.

It also means (and who couldn’t see this coming?) paid advertising will be more and more important to brands wanting to get noticed on Instagram. Facebook, Instagram’s owner, already makes it super easy to launch a standalone ad or one that’s part of a Facebook campaign (you have to set up your Instagram campaign using Facebook anyway). Now that your post runs the risk of being pushed further down a user’s timeline, paying to push it to them when they open the app is the best way to guarantee your post is seen.

What does this mean to you as a brand? Develop the best, most engaging content you can, post consistently and budget for paid social advertising. If you need help with any of those three prongs, bloomfield knoble (bloomfieldknoble on Instagram) is always here to help.

Oh, and by all means, follow jeffcarrington on Instagram, and turn on alerts for my account.


 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
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# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

 

27 May 2016
brd-moody-graphic

Twitter Character Count: Much A-Twitter About Nothing?

Wiser words were never said.
Wiser words were never said.

Make no mistake, Twitter is my favorite social network. Facebook feels like a guilty pleasure (why am I stalking friends while they’re on vacation?). LinkedIn is, frankly, a snooze. And I’m not enough of a shutterbug to get a lot of use out of Instagram or Snapchat. Twitter is just more … useful.

I get news, traffic, jokes, updates from organizations I’m involved with and little glimpses into (but not full-on photo essays on) the lives of friends. I find it’s the first place I go for breaking news nationally or locally. I’m just more likely to find what’s really going on, in real time, on Twitter than from a news outlet. When a temblor hits Irving, the first place I look to is my “Irving Earthquake” search term newsfeed to see if it was really a quake and verify the magnitude.

So you’d think I’d be more excited about the changes coming to the character limit than I am.

To catch you up – in a recent blog, Twitter announced the following:

“In the coming months we’ll make changes to simplify Tweets including what counts toward your 140 characters, so for instance, @names in replies and media attachments (like photos, GIFs, videos, and polls) will no longer “use up” valuable characters. Here’s what will change:

  • Replies: When replying to a Tweet, @names will no longer count toward the 140-character count. This will make having conversations on Twitter easier and more straightforward, no more penny-pinching your words to ensure they reach the whole group.
  • Media attachments: When you add attachments like photos, GIFs, videos, polls, or Quote Tweets, that media will no longer count as characters within your Tweet. More room for words!
  • Retweet and Quote Tweet yourself: We’ll be enabling the Retweet button on your own Tweets, so you can easily Retweet or Quote Tweet yourself when you want to share a new reflection or feel like a really good one went unnoticed.
  • Goodbye, .@: These changes will help simplify the rules around Tweets that start with a username. New Tweets that begin with a username will reach all your followers. (That means you’ll no longer have to use the “.@” convention, which people currently use to broadcast Tweets broadly.) If you want a reply to be seen by all your followers, you will be able to Retweet it to signal that you intend for it to be viewed more broadly.”

The big news here is the fact that attachments like images, videos, GIFs, polls and quote tweets no longer count as 24 characters. This is all well and good, and I’m happy to have the additional real estate to compose my thoughts. It seems more straightforward than trying to do math when planning to insert an image or video (ask anyone – nothing causes a dark cloud to creep over my face more than math).

But it’s not a game changer. I think individuals trying to compose a clever thought or update will get the most use out of the extra characters. But for companies who have been building their audience and engagement and adhering to best practices, this should have little impact.

Basically it boils down to brevity. The goal has always been to keep Tweets as short as possible. According to Twitter’s own research (via Buddy Media) Tweets shorter than 100 characters get a 17% higher engagement rate, so why would you want to go longer? Just because you have the extra space isn’t a reason to make your Tweets longer.

This change will only be a boon to the longwinded individual user who can now use the full 140 characters and still share the cat GIF they found on Reddit.

As they’ve done in the past with changes to the platform, Twitter may release a corresponding paid promotional feature that takes advantage of the new character count. That will certainly be something that bloomfield knoble will be watching out for, to consider for brands doing paid advertising. For now though, don’t look for brands to start telling you to buy their product or service using 24 additional characters.

 


 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

29 Apr 2016

About Snapchat – It’s Not Just Sexting Anymore

Snapchat_Logo

At this point, who hasn’t heard of Snapchat? The popular photo-sharing app has become so ubiquitous that it can even advertise itself without saying a word. If you’re over 30, while you’ve heard of it, you probably don’t completely understand it.

I’m over 30 too, and I don’t blame you. If you’ve tried to use it, you know the user interface begs for a seasoned user to give you a lesson. Think teens at a lunchtable or in the library showing each other how it works and what a swipe or icon means. As adults with careers, we tend to figure things out on our own, not huddled over our iPhones with friends.

This definitely isn’t the cool-kids table, but gather ‘round and get a Snapchat briefing for the over-30 crowd.

What is Snapchat?

Snapchat is a photo and video sharing mobile app. It launched in 2011 and because of the feature that deletes photos from the recipient’s phone after up to 10 seconds, it became infamous as a sexting app for teens. Today, that stigma is gone – photos can be accessed longer via the Story feature and the company has made moves to attract brands, further “maturing” its image.

Usage

200 million users

Over 100 million daily users

800 million photos and videos shared every day

Six in 10 people age 13 – 35 use Snapchat

12% of daily users are age 35 – 54

Usage in all age groups is growing

 

Screen Shot 2016-04-29 at 2.11.42 PM
An example of Snapchat’s customization features. You can also write or draw on photos.

Photo and Video Sharing

Snapchat’s core functionality is sharing content immediately, with the ability to add captions, emojis, frames or “lenses” directly to the image. Its differentiator is that the photos disappear from the recipient’s device after up to 10 seconds (the sender determines the length of time).

Stories

Another feature is the SnapChat Story, which was added after the app caught on. Users can select the option for a photo to be moved to their “Story,” which allows their followers to view that image alongside all their story images – for the next 24 hours.

The Story feature is the primary way brands engage with Snapchat. It’s also the primary way I’ve found to enjoy the app. I don’t have much reason to post pictures for my friends that only last 10 seconds. Unless they’re of my dog, of course.

Discover

The Discover home screen.
The Discover home screen.

Snapchat highlights 20 content publishers in their Discover section. Hand-selected by Snapchat (making a spot in the Discover section highly coveted), these brands are able to post content that users can scroll through – images with headlines/captions and the ability to swipe up for more to the story. These are not advertisements, but rather news/lifestyle posts.

Examples: CNN posts news images and headlines with the rest of the story in the swipe below. Food Network posts videos and images of food with the recipe below.

I’ve used this feature the most, and gotten the most enjoyment out of it. I love my friends, but the latest news from Syria trumps their latest picture with a racooon face lens or showing off a cookie shaped like a Wookiee. (I loved those, Sam, but c’mon – Syria.)

How Does Snapchat Make Money?

Screen Shot 2016-04-29 at 2.01.08 PM
Snapchat sponsored lenses

Sponsored Lenses – This feature allows users to take a picture or video of themselves and add different animated, branded filters to the shot. 20th Century Fox was the first, allowing animated selfie features with Peanuts characters to promote “The Peanuts Movie” last Fall.

User Base Reach – Snapchat also charges between $450,000 and $750,000 per post for a brand to reach the app’s entire user base. Peak days like Halloween, Thanksgiving and Black Friday are priced at the upper end of that spectrum, while normal days can vary.

Should You Use It?

Snapchat still appeals primarily to a younger audience, but as with Facebook and Twitter, the trend is that older users are logging on.

The benefit to posting on Snapchat is the immediacy and connectivity. Because content is gone in 24 hours, users tend to be more attentive and engaged with Snapchat content than other platforms.

From a personal standpoint, even for a 30+ user, there are some interesting and fun ways to use it. I have a lot of young friends, and I make a living working with social media apps and promotions, so I have a really good reason to use it. But if you don’t know anyone else on it, there’s not much point from a personal use perspective unless you want to be on the vanguard of your group of over-30 friends.

If you’re looking for the next platform to leverage your brand, you definitely need to look at who your target audience is and how you want to communicate with them. Large brands from McDonald’s to General Electric to Sour Patch Kids have been active users with interesting campaigns using Snapchat’s unique features and young-skewing audience. A financial services company is probably wasting their time – for now. But give it a few years and you just might need to know how to engage Snapchat users because that’s where your target audience will be.

As we like to say around here at bloomfield knoble, fish where the fish are. The best reason to adopt a new social platform is because your target audience is already there. But don’t waste your efforts in a pond that doesn’t have the fish you want.

And that’s the bell. Put your phones up. See you in class.

 


 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

14 Jan 2016

The bk ‘We Care’ Campaign Launches for 2016

The Special Olympics is bk's longest running We Care program.
The Special Olympics is bk’s longest running We Care program.

I know, I know. The year just ended and you were barraged with social media messages about holiday charitable support from seemingly every company in the U.S. Holiday charitable support now seems as ubiquitous to the holiday season as “Holiday Sales Events” (kill me).

At that time of year we, bloomfield knoble (bk), may appear to be callous or indifferent to charitable support. The fact is, we provide support year-round. So by December we are wrapping up our 12-months of work and readying for the new year of support. Like everything, we kind of over achieve. It’s in our nature.

If you are not familiar, the bk “We Care” program consists of our choosing 12 charitable organizations each January. We provide financial support to all of them in January, then we spotlight one each month of the year to provide pro bono social media support or hands-on volunteerism by the bk staff. Most of the organizations have been supported by bk for years. However, we do try to add in new worthy causes each year. For instance, this month, we are spotlighting the Special Olympics of Texas. This is the 18th year we have provided support to the Special Olympics. It was the original organization we chose when we founded this agency and we hold that group very close to our hearts.

Last year I finally made the effort to explain why we let you know that we support charities. Here is that blog Why bk is Telling You We Support Charities. Therefore, I won’t go into that again. But I do reiterate that providing support for organizations year-round is better than checking it off a list once each winter.

It is wonderful that people think of charitable efforts during the holiday season. But making a difference means committing to some heavy lifting all year long. Since we focus on several human/civil rights organizations and environmental groups, we know they need support every day in any way they can get it. Therefore, we encourage our peers and colleagues in the industry to adopt this approach. It is actually less effort and more meaningful than just writing a check at the end of the year.

Further, while there is nothing wrong with supporting one group at the end of the year, we would urge you to consider sharing the wealth and expanding your support.

As an agency, we have found that our focusing each month on a different cause or group allows us to include every one in the office. Some people may not be much of an American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) supporter (I am, however). However, they may really be into pandas, so the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) gets them more involved and jazzed to support that month.

bk Partner Chris Weatherley's We Care organization of choice is the Coastal Conservation Association.
bk Partner Chris Weatherley’s We Care organization of choice is the Coastal Conservation Association.

It’s about inclusiveness and maximizing the impact we make. Just because our creative director/agency partner, Chris Weatherley, is really into the Coastal Conservation Association (CCA), doesn’t mean that Thomas Thompson, our lead strategist is. In fact, I think Thom prefers the Electronics Take Back Coalition to any outdoor activity we might support.

The point I am making is that in order to make an impact we have to get people involved. As a top advertising agency based in Dallas, TX, we simply applied the same tactics to our internal charitable support as we do to client advertising planning campaigns – reach people where and when they are most interested. Limiting one’s reach to one group minimizes interest with your potential participants. As with any marketing effort, we activate the target audience through compelling content that drives them to take an action. It’s advertising 101, really.

So follow us through social media  and support our “We Care” campaign throughout this year. Take note as we implement our social media editorial calendar and support a different organization each month by highlighting the volunteerism in our office, as well as general support of the organizations’ own outreach and awareness efforts.

Then, why not join bk and change up your support format from a holiday theme to a dedicated annual effort? We could all use your help.

Thank you for your support – Eric J Hirschhorn, partner, the bloomfield knoble Advertising Agency


 About The Author

clark-bachelot-headshotEric J. Hirschhorn is a principal at bloomfield knoble. For 17 years he has helped lead the Dallas-based advertising agency from start up to becoming a premier, full-service agency whose clients include some of the most influential companies in America. Eric lives to spend time with his family, to work and to travel the world in search of unique fishing adventures.

Connect With Eric Hirschhorn
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# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

30 Jun 2015
twitterwhoops

Answer Twitter Questions Without Getting ‘Jamesed’

twitterwhoopsYou may have seen that renowned and respected widely derided and somewhat filthy author E.L. James (Fifty Shades of Grey) held a Twitter Q&A for some reason yesterday. It unexpectedly (?) didn’t go well.

Users pounced, using the hashtag #AskELJames to ask pointed questions about her lack of writing skill, the misogynistic and sexually unhealthy themes in her books and ultimately, just the ludicrous idea that she thought it would go smoothly.

This may scare you off of the idea of hosting your own Twitter (or Reddit, or other social platform) Q&A, in which you or a representative of your company answer questions submitted by users on the social platform. But it doesn’t have to be so scary. Especially if you haven’t written a popular yet polarizing and much-ridiculed erotica book series.

At bloomfield knoble, we’ve helped clients large and small host successful Twitter Q&As, and presented here are some of the ways we help them achieve the goals of increased engagement, transparency and goodwill:

Avoid planning around other big news events the company’s involved in. This avoids being overshadowed by that event or having negative feedback that might unexpectedly be associated with it.

At least two weeks out, begin posting to your Twitter and other social accounts with the Q&A hashtag, establishing the host and topic and how to submit questions. Post twice a day leading up to the event to reach as many users as possible.

 If budget permits, pay to promote Tweets and Facebook posts to expand the reach. Set aside posts day-of to promote an hour before and then at the start time.

Have questions directed at a recognizable host figure or, alternately, establish the host as the leading expert on the topic prior to the Q&A.

Establish an appropriate hashtag that conveys the nature of the Q&A. Research that hashtag to ensure that it isn’t readily hijacked due to an inadvertently negative or suggestive double-meaning.

If the host or topic is not an established commodity that promises engagement (will users be motivated to put aside an hour of their day to log in and submit questions?), accept questions in advance using the hashtag and curate which will be answered during the established Q&A period.

Create a list of all the negative questions that you can conceive would be asked and be ready with a plan for how to address those issues. Some may best be ignored, but others might be legitimate and need an intelligent, strategically crafted response.

Provide the host or hosts with appropriate resources to answer questions. Once you’ve created your list of possible topics that might come up, both positive and negative, have links to appropriate resources ready for them to easily direct users to those resources.

Be prepared to take in-depth inquiries off-line. Prepare the wording in advance for how to shift those conversations to another venue.

Post-event, use the data gathered from the questions asked to develop content moving forward – blogs, tweets, etc.

For subsequent Q&As, analyze how users participated. If you receive more questions in advance and few during the hour, continue with that model. If more users logged in for the hour and submitted live questions, shift the focus to a live format in the future.

If only E.L. had come to us.


 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

 

30 Jun 2015
twitterwhoops

Answer Twitter Questions Without Getting 'Jamesed'

twitterwhoopsYou may have seen that renowned and respected widely derided and somewhat filthy author E.L. James (Fifty Shades of Grey) held a Twitter Q&A for some reason yesterday. It unexpectedly (?) didn’t go well.

Users pounced, using the hashtag #AskELJames to ask pointed questions about her lack of writing skill, the misogynistic and sexually unhealthy themes in her books and ultimately, just the ludicrous idea that she thought it would go smoothly.

This may scare you off of the idea of hosting your own Twitter (or Reddit, or other social platform) Q&A, in which you or a representative of your company answer questions submitted by users on the social platform. But it doesn’t have to be so scary. Especially if you haven’t written a popular yet polarizing and much-ridiculed erotica book series.

At bloomfield knoble, we’ve helped clients large and small host successful Twitter Q&As, and presented here are some of the ways we help them achieve the goals of increased engagement, transparency and goodwill:

Avoid planning around other big news events the company’s involved in. This avoids being overshadowed by that event or having negative feedback that might unexpectedly be associated with it.

At least two weeks out, begin posting to your Twitter and other social accounts with the Q&A hashtag, establishing the host and topic and how to submit questions. Post twice a day leading up to the event to reach as many users as possible.

 If budget permits, pay to promote Tweets and Facebook posts to expand the reach. Set aside posts day-of to promote an hour before and then at the start time.

Have questions directed at a recognizable host figure or, alternately, establish the host as the leading expert on the topic prior to the Q&A.

Establish an appropriate hashtag that conveys the nature of the Q&A. Research that hashtag to ensure that it isn’t readily hijacked due to an inadvertently negative or suggestive double-meaning.

If the host or topic is not an established commodity that promises engagement (will users be motivated to put aside an hour of their day to log in and submit questions?), accept questions in advance using the hashtag and curate which will be answered during the established Q&A period.

Create a list of all the negative questions that you can conceive would be asked and be ready with a plan for how to address those issues. Some may best be ignored, but others might be legitimate and need an intelligent, strategically crafted response.

Provide the host or hosts with appropriate resources to answer questions. Once you’ve created your list of possible topics that might come up, both positive and negative, have links to appropriate resources ready for them to easily direct users to those resources.

Be prepared to take in-depth inquiries off-line. Prepare the wording in advance for how to shift those conversations to another venue.

Post-event, use the data gathered from the questions asked to develop content moving forward – blogs, tweets, etc.

For subsequent Q&As, analyze how users participated. If you receive more questions in advance and few during the hour, continue with that model. If more users logged in for the hour and submitted live questions, shift the focus to a live format in the future.

If only E.L. had come to us.


 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

 

16 Jan 2015
Unknown

bloomfield knoble’s ‘We Care’ Initiative Is Designed To Make A Difference

Each year bloomfield knoble (bk) gives generously to various environmental and community organizations on a local and national level through its “We Care” program. The agency is proud to announce that its annual donations for 2015 have been made.

Unknown“Now the real work begins,” says agency partner Eric Hirschhorn. “We set a year-long calendar of effort to help deliver results to these groups. That’s why our program is unique. Nobody in our industry – or any industry I know of – has this type of program and history to commitment. We don’t just want to say we donated to a cause. We want to see the cause ‘win.’”

The organizations supported by bloomfield knoble through “We Care” include a variety of organizations ranging from conservation to special needs to fighting disease to access to freedom and information. In addition to financial contributions, bloomfield knoble engages in active social media monitoring, posting and promoting of these causes to increase public awareness and engagement. Pro bono design and consulting for organizations is provided, where it fits the need. The agency also encourages its staff and clients to take volunteer opportunities with these and other organizations.

Here are the 12 organizations the bk We Care program supports:

 

Each month the agency selects one of its 12 charitable causes or movements it has supported (in many cases for 10+ years) and provides pro bono awareness through its social media channels and other outreach initiatives. bk uses its social media expertise and website exposure to grow engagement with these organizations, to promote events/initiatives and fundraising.

Here are a couple of recent examples from 2015 where We Care has begun to promote the Electronics Takeback Coalition to launch the year of We Care support.

Screen Shot 2015-01-16 at 10.41.37 AM

Screen Shot 2015-01-16 at 10.55.19 AM
“It’s easy to just send a check and feel like you’ve contributed,” says Chris Weatherley, the agency’s other partner. “But we just don’t think that is enough. It’s the volunteering of our time and resources which helps make a difference. We want these important organizations to make a difference. That’s why we do this and share our story throughout the year.”

If you’re a charity and would like to be part of bk’s We Care initiative, use our contact form and mention “We Care” and Eric Hirschhorn will contact you.


 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.