Category: Technology

20 Aug 2018
radio-blog_google

3 Reasons to Try Radio Advertising in DFW

As I sat stuck in stop-start traffic on switch from 183 East to the Turnpike this morning, I was reminded of the power of advertising. Here I was, switching back and forth on my preset channels, looking for a morning rush talk show that I like. What was marked as a 20-minute commute on my phone was suddenly a 45-minute frustration.

Image result for dallas traffic

Now, I’m never really one to plan my meals; I tend to let my mood decide or just skip lunch all together. However, I was quickly persuaded to get a sandwich today, as Subway, a favorite of mine (that I completely forgot about for some reason), played a simple commercial while I stared at the tail lights in front of me.

This small act made me think—maybe there’s something to radio advertising that’s worth talking about. Perhaps this seemingly old-fashion, slightly intimidating medium isn’t so removed after all, and, in fact, could really benefit your business specially if your audience lives or works in Dallas / Fort Worth.

  • Your customers are always driving [and probably stuck in traffic]

Whether your target audience is C-level executives, college students or stay-at-home parents, they’ll spend some time driving. The INRIX 2017 Global Traffic Scorecard reports that Dallas drivers each spent an average of 54 hours of last year stuck in traffic (about 6%), ranking Dallas as one of the top 30 global cities that has high traffic congestion. As maddening as that is, it couldn’t feel more accurate. Does this mean that your customers listen to the AM/FM radio while in their car? With this fact alone, probably not, but you have already increased your reach out of shear probability.

  • DFW has a huge music scene that utilizes the radio

Between live music at restaurants or festivals and concerts at the American Airlines Center, it’s obvious that DFW is a place of music lovers. How does this help you? According to a 2017 Nielsen State of the Media Report, AM/FM radio reaches more Americans each week than any other platform (including phones and television). This means that, with a strong strategy that focuses on your target audience and their preference in music, you can create a planned approach to appeal to your local customers.

  • Your customers may need a medium changeup

If your print and video campaigns seem to fall short, it could be an issue with impact. While we work within the average attention span of eight seconds, it may be harder than you realize to make an impression. In 2017, the IE School of Human Sciences & Technology (via the American Marketing Association) conducted studies showing that “the average consumer is exposed to up to 10,000 brand messages a day.” What’s more, “consumers switch screens up to 21 times an hour.” That’s a lot of information to take in visually.

In this case, the Radio Advertising Bureau infers that radio can be used as additional medium to your regular channels, as a form of recency (or brand reminders). This small form of reinforcement can boost your reach and presence, so they’ll be reminded of you when they need your product or services. The concept is exactly how the Subway advertisement quietly persuaded me to have a sandwich for lunch today.

Where do you start?

Our team can help you identify who specifically are your customers and their needs. Once we know your advertising goals, we can strategize with you to make the most of your radio advertisements. Check out our services.

Photo credit: The Dallas Morning News

 


About the Author

amanda-lovewell-headshot

Amanda Lovewell is a copyeditor for bloomfield knoble. She works to keep the brand voice intact for us, and for our clients. She lives for any form of artistic expression, especially music. One day, she would love to travel creating short stories about her misadventures.

Connect with Amanda Lovewell
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

11 Jul 2018
google

Aim for the Bullseye, then Try Again

Every marketing and advertising campaign needs associated metric goals and reporting. These key performance indicators (KPIs) help you tailor the future of your marketing team [or allocation if you wear multiple hats].

When asked “Is your marketing successful?” 43% of CoSchedule’s surveyed group answered neutral or lower. If almost half are undecisive or unsatisfied, that’s a lot of wasted effort. But did you know that cognitive computing can help you aim your campaigns more closely to your audience and speed up the fine-tuning of your campaign styles?

As discussed in the first two parts of this series, marketing and advertising campaigns are a mixture of creative thinking and mass amounts of data—e.g., understanding your customer and showing them something that would get their attention.

Truer than trial and error, cognitive computing gives you a simulated estimate of the feedback from your audience. This serves your business two-fold.

Firstly, you can have an idea of what you can expect from your customers before the launch. [This is different than what we talked about in part 2; here, we are talking about after the design is completed, but before the campaign is actually unveiled.] By gauging your customer response prior to the actual campaign launch, you can set realistic goals and benchmarks.

Holding your campaign to unrealistically high KPIs will just bum you out, even if the results are positive. Adversely, unrealistically low KPIs will make you pessimistic and quite possibility kill your campaign before it even hits the ground. It’s all about perception when it comes to your goals, and, in this case, foresight will make you more accurate and potentially happier.

Secondly, when you campaign is completed, you can compare the estimated metrics against the actual metrics for a post-mortem on your completed campaign. Since your expectations were realistic, you can ask yourself, did the results match? Was there a higher response from an unexpected market or audience? Did you overspend or underspend where it really would have made a difference?

This follow-up is essential to moving forward with your marketing mindset. Seeing your KPIs compared against your now-logical goals allows you to rework what you learned into your next advertising campaign. You can finally gain that competitive edge… on yourself.

Don’t miss out on:

Part 1: Your Campaign Worked… But How Do You Know Which Part?

Part 2: Stimulate Your Creative Process

 


About the Author

amanda-lovewell-headshot

Amanda Lovewell is a copyeditor for bloomfield knoble. She works to keep the brand voice intact for us, and for our clients. She lives for any form of artistic expression, especially music. One day, she would love to travel creating short stories about her misadventures.

 

Connect with Amanda Lovewell
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

 


Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

27 Jun 2018
data-vs-goliath-part-2-051618_google

Stimulate Your Creative Process

Before customer data was so readily available and the number of mediums became countless, advertising was simpler. Still a challenge, but simpler.

I think of Mad Men, particularly when they come up with the idea for lipsticks in season 1. What we watched was a focus group of their target audience (young women of the 1960s) try on various hues of lipsticks and answering questions from the company’s market researcher.

Once they figured out the copy – and the copywriter in this case – the episode is done with this plot.

The thing is… today, that’s only half the job. Where does this ad go? Does it come out as an email blast, mailouts, text messages, billboards, a magazine, etc.? They never tell us the base strategy of the campaign, which personally bothers me, because the slogans they decide on are so abstract that I can’t wrap my head around a medium that works with the copy. I see a vague design, but not a medium.

In part 1 of these series, we talked about how cognitive computing mimics human thoughts and opinions. In that statement alone, so much is unsaid by the person, like:

  • Do I know this brand?
  • Is this something I’ve heard of?
  • Do I know anyone who uses or recommends this?
  • Is this brand honest?
  • Will I waste my money here, or get tricked?
  • Do I expect any repercussions or stigmatization for using the brand?
  • Do I actually need to buy this?

Learning how your customers (active or potential) behave prepares you for these questions moving forward. The good news is once you identify this information and let it evolve with your growing or changing clientele, you get to go back to creative part.

Why do you need to do the strategy first? It might seem more fun to come up with catchy slogans with your coworkers and then make it an advertisement… because it is. However, your medium decides the roots of the message you choose, and sometimes, what you come up with doesn’t fit where you want to advertise. Slogans for a billboard may not work for a commercial spot. A magazine ad may not work for mailed postcards.

Once you know how (strategy) and where (medium) you want to advertise, you have guidelines to work with. Cognitive computing brings you there more quickly, by helping you see the way your customers think and feel – with real numbers that you can trust. Then you use these results to start brainstorming, which is already stronger due to your focus on your audience and your medium. It’s much easier to be creative with a directly, then to just pull ideas out of the idea.

Don’t skip Part 1. Check it out here.

 


About the Author

amanda-lovewell-headshot

Amanda Lovewell is a copyeditor for bloomfield knoble. She works to keep the brand voice intact for us, and for our clients. She lives for any form of artistic expression, especially music. One day, she would love to travel creating short stories about her misadventures.

Connect with Amanda Lovewell
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

 


Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

17 May 2018
data-vs-goliath-part-1-050818_google

Your campaign worked… but how do you know which part?

You’ve done the research, the legwork and maybe even some focus studies before your last campaign, and the results were actually strong enough to reach your goals. That’s great! But what made it different from the others that had less success? It can be hard to tell without the right tools or information.

What is cognitive computing?

According to IBM, 2.5 quintillion bytes of data is created daily – that’s a huge increase of data compared to just a few years ago. Studies show that 90% of the data in the world has been created in the last two years alone. It’s too much to process but it’s all important. That data contains your consumers opinions and preferences, which is as available as it is fast through just scrolling down a social media feed.

Cognitive computing synthesizes the data you need by using artificial intelligence and machine learning to simulate how the human mind operates. Basically, cognitive computing impacts advertising by helping you guide your campaign to align its message with its audience.

In 1998, bloomfield knoble was founded as an internet design and development company that quickly blossomed into a full-service advertising agency. We use creativity and cognitive computing to work with our company, including large U.S. organizations like NASA, Fannie Mae and Vizient.

Through observed trends and patterns of typical target customer thoughts, opinions, emotions and actions, campaign results become more accurate and, therefore, more valuable.

The cognitive way of thinking is quickly catching fire. In fact, according to a survey conducted during a 2017 IBM study:

  • 73% of global CEOs feel that “cognitive computing will play an important role in the future of their organizations”
  • 50% of global CEOs said “they plan to adopt cognitive computing by 2019”
  • Executives who participated in the survey anticipate 15% return on investment from these endeavors

How will your business benefit from this?

This 3-part series is based on a presentation by our chief operating officer, Tom Thompson, on May 18, 2018, at the Plano Chamber of Commerce Chairman’s Council Breakfast.


About the Author

amanda-lovewell-headshot

Amanda Lovewell is a copyeditor for bloomfield knoble. She works to keep the brand voice intact for us, and for our clients. She lives for any form of artistic expression, especially music. One day, she would love to travel creating short stories about her misadventures.

Connect with Amanda Lovewell
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

 


Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

14 Feb 2017
soundlly

Watching TV is about to get even more interactive.

Soundlly is using data-filled tones to stream additional content to mobile devices.

Let me start this post off by saying that “Soundlly” is not a typo, no matter what spell-check / auto-correct says. Instead, Soundlly is the name of a company in Seoul, South Korea, which has developed a technology that uses sounds at low volume to deliver bonus television content to your cellphone or tablet. So there.

Anyway, I always liked the Shazam app. I thought it was a great way to learn more about songs that caught my attention. I know there was (and may still be) a big push to use Shazam as part of TV ads and movie trailers, etc., but I don’t think I used it for anything other than learning who was singing what song. When Shazam became available through Siri (“Who is this singing?”) I deleted the app, but love the idea. Now comes a new concept – sounds at low volume used to deliver bonus television content to a cellphone or tablet.

“Imagine that you’re watching a travel program and your phone instantly receives the exact location, booking details and nearby attractions of the place you see,” says Tae Hyun Kim of Soundlly. The system uses the TV’s speakers to play data-filled tones alongside whatever you are watching. You won’t notice a difference, but the microphone on your smartphone will, picking up additional content streamed alongside the main event. “This can make television interactive,” says Tae. This use of ultrasound is already possible, but the volume levels break broadcasting rules and can irritate people or animals. “The real advantage of our system is that its noise level is the same as a quiet library,” says Tae.

From a technology perspective, Soundlly is easy to implement because it’s all software. Just integrate the Soundlly SDK in your app to easily build a second screen service. They provide a full software package to send a sound beacon through any speakers that can be detected by a mobile device. From an advertising perspective, we’re all looking for ways to extend brand equity onto the second screen to drive engagement and this may be a good way to achieve it. As I mentioned earlier, I know some brands put the Shazam logo in the corner of their ads (and may still do), but that relies on listening and connectivity to an outside source. I used to watch DaVinci’s Demons on cable and they had a companion app to the show that was really good. It would give additional information about the historical setting of the show and you could learn more about characters, etc. It was a great app except that it was timed like a rehearsed slide show. You pressed “start” on the app at the beginning of the show and they ran side-by-side. Of course, the minute I paused the show or closed the app, I lost the benefit of the app.

The current trend in second-screen engagement seems to be real-time interaction on social media. I know this can happen organically, but some shows, like The Blacklist on NBC, push this engagement with directed hashtags and fan interaction during the broadcast (I’m guilty of this, by the way – as a fan – not because they are a client). Anyway, delivering data via this type of stream would ensure timely and relevant content to an engaged audience. This type of technology would be a great way to deliver unique content, coupons, engage users (such as live voting) or retargeting. Even better, this technology is already available and being used by brands in Korea, which means there is (or will be) some data available to justify the addition of this SDK on behalf of clients.
I know that it’s really, really hard to break onto the second screen, but I think this type of technology is a great fit for QVC or any type of cooking program. The ability for an app to interact through any broadcast and deliver a call to action in real-time (or later) is a powerful tool for agencies and certainly worth exploring further. Check them out for yourself at http://www.soundl.ly.

PS – I put their URL to prove that I have not been spelling their name incorrectly. Furthermore, I just think the technology is clever – I have no stake or ties to this company – but would like to.

 


About the Author

thomas-thompson-headshot

A STEM (Science / Technology / Engineering / Math) graduate and COO of bloomfield knoble, Thomas exemplifies the view that advertising is becoming an engineering discipline. He leads the integrated insights and strategic planning group in a way consistent with bloomfield knoble’s goal of bringing a strong analytical foundation to uncover fresh and innovative insights and business opportunities.
Connect with Thomas Thompson
twitter
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

15 Jan 2017

Caveat Empclicktwittor

The same machines that help us better target can also hurt us.

Caveat Empclicktwittor is me pretending I remember anything from high school Latin class, but I’m going to loosely translate it as, “beware what you click on Twitter” because it turns out that the same machines that help us better target customers can also hurt us. Nevertheless, I love Twitter. It’s my favorite social media platform. Admittedly, it’s the only social media platform I use, so I may be a bit prejudiced, but fortunately I’m not the “social media person” here at bloomfield knoble, so I don’t have to use any others.

One of my favorite things to do on Twitter is to craft tweets that will generate engagement (likes, retweets, comments, etc.). I get a rush every time I see that little dot next to the Twitter logo on my iPhone. It’s not exactly an obsession, but I will admit that I have annoyed Jeff Carrington, who is the “social media person” here at bloomfield knoble, a bunch of times to learn best practices and methods that improve my chances of generating engagement. However, I know I’m not obsessed, because I don’t troll and I don’t (usually) tweet at autoresponders. I love interacting with people on Twitter and having conversations at 140 characters with people I don’t know perfectly fits my generally anti-social behavior. So if you’re tweeting to me, or even just about a topic I like, it’s not unusual for me to jump in.

Unfortunately, that may be about to change.

I didn’t grow up with social media, but I understand it. I know how to spot clickbait and phishing, where crooks try to trick people into clicking links to malware or sites that steal personal information, is common on Twitter. So as much as I love seeing that dot on my iPhone, I know better than to fall for the obvious. Or, I did. According to Sally Adee, writing in NewScientist, a machine learning system that reads our past tweets to craft personalized traps could make clicking links that show up in my Twitter feed even riskier.

Some criminals take the trouble to tailor their phishing tweets to specific individuals by hand – known as spearphishing. For example, (and it’s been suspended, so I don’t feel like I’m helping out the enemy here), @NatWest_HelpTC was a scam account that responded to anyone tweeting a customer service question at NatWest Bank’s real Twitter account. The imposters direct users to a fake NatWest site in an attempt to harvest bank login details. Success rates for spearphishing are estimated to be around 45%, but it’s also time consuming. Banks shouldn’t count on the difficulty of phishing protecting their customer though – researchers at Baltimore security company Zerofox have shown that spearphishing can be done automatically.

By mining people’s past Twitter activity, their mating learning system first hunts down a target. It looks for high-profile or well-connected users – such as those who list a job title like recruiter or CEO in their profile – and people who are particularly active. Zerofox’s Philip Tully says they also targeted people by looking at the hashtags they used in their tweets, as well as what the person likes to retweet and the times they are most likely to be using Twitter. Using this information, the algorithm generates tweets that the individual is likely to click on – and behold, personalized clickbait.

The team tested the system on 90 people and managed to trick more than two-thirds of them into clicking the link. The team thinks that the approach could reach far more people with a greater success rate than handcrafted approaches. They also say the system would work on other social media sites, including Facebook. the work was presented at the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas last month. But it’s not just about clicks. A recent study from Columbia University found that 60% of people don’t click or read the links they retweet. Tully says that’s a boon for the technique his team is warning about – no look retweeters are effectively laundering the scam tweets, giving them a sense of legitimacy and making it more likely that others will click.

Avoiding the trap isn’t always easy, but keep your operating system up-to-date; have a virus-protection program running on your system, and – especially if you are reaching out to customer service – only click on links offered from the verified account. As an agency heavily involved in social media advertising, we are very careful to avoid content that sounds like clickbait. While we would love to get a 45% success rate, we try to mitigate the potential fury of customers on social media that fall for scams. Unfortunately, like in the case of NatWest, it’s hard and spearphishing attacks have plagued them – and others – as long as Twitter has been around.

 


About the Author

thomas-thompson-headshot

A STEM (Science / Technology / Engineering / Math) graduate and COO of bloomfield knoble, Thomas exemplifies the view that advertising is becoming an engineering discipline. He leads the integrated insights and strategic planning group in a way consistent with bloomfield knoble’s goal of bringing a strong analytical foundation to uncover fresh and innovative insights and business opportunities.
Connect with Thomas Thompson
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

 


Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

01 Sep 2016
panda-img

Browser extension…look like a Panda

Check out this content aggregator for design inspiration and creative industry news

panda

One of my absolute favorite internet browser extensions has to be the Panda plug-in. Panda, as it’s known, is a widget that displays design-specific content as the default page when opening a new tab in your browser. The widget is semi-customizable, in which you can pick and choose from various layouts and sources of aggregated design content from all over the web, ranging from news feeds of creative publications to tiles of user-submitted artwork.

Not only does it dish out the low-down on the industry’s trending topics, but it also provides an environment where contributors can showcase their skills and exchange ideas and techniques. As a creative myself, it’s nice to have a constant source of relative inspiration and news regarding the industry of design today. It’s an easy way to browse through a wide variety of artistic styles.

To download the Panda plug-in/extension, follow these links:


About the Author

andy-edwards-headshot

Andy Edwards is Director of Digital Services at bloomfield knoble. He possesses the hybrid skills of a strategic business executive and a creative, problem-solving designer; someone who is a catalyst for transformation and the agent of cultural change.
Connect with Andy Edwards
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

15 Feb 2016

True Artificial Intelligence Closer to Reality

I, for one, welcome our new computer overlord.

I’ve seen enough movies to know that an Artificial Intelligence will rule the planet some day. While these usually end up going pretty poorly for humans (The Matrix, Terminator), I’m hoping that a pro-AI article (most likely being read by the AI) will allow me a position in the new world order. Perhaps bloomfield knoble can be the agency promoting the excellence and benevolence of our wise, yet still humble, AI ruler?

Why the sudden shift on the AI spectrum? It’s because the evil geniuses at Google DeepMind, along with equally evil geniuses at the Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms (MILA) at the University of Montreal, have created a machine that beat the European champion at the ancient game of Go and mastered several video games from the Atari 2600. While that may not seem a huge deal (I mean, really, Space Invaders wasn’t that challenging – I totally mastered it after 3 years of constant play), the face that the team just created an artificial intelligence that can navigate 3D mazes (think Doom) is.

According to a recently published article, the team proposes “a conceptually simple and lightweight framework for deep reinforcement learning that uses asynchronous gradient descent for optimization of deep neural network controllers. The best performing method, an asynchronous variant of actor-critic . . . succeeds on a wide variety of continuous motor control problems as well as on a new task involving finding rewards in random 3D mazes using a visual input.” In plain language, they just invented a machine that can play a game by looking at the screen. This really should be written like, JUST BY LOOKING AT THE SCREEN!

From a science perspective, this is a big deal because it was generally believed that the combination of simple online reinforcement learning algorithms with deep neural networks was fundamentally unstable. Most research in this area focused on the idea that the sequence of observed data encountered by an online reinforcement learning agent is non-stationary and online reinforcement learning updates are strongly correlated. By storing the agent’s data in an experience replay memory, the data can be batched or randomly sampled from different time-steps. Aggregating over memory in this way reduces non-stationarity and decor relates updates, but at the same time limits the methods to off-policy refinfocement learning algorithms. The authors instead present a very different paradigm for deep reinforcement learning. Instead of experience replay, they asynchronously execute multiple agents in parallel, on multiple instances of the environment. This parallelism also decor relates the agents’ data into a more stationary process, since at given time-step the parallel agents will be experiencing a variety of different states. This simple idea enables a much larger spectrum on fundamental on-policy reinforcement learning algorithms to be applied robustly and effectively using deep neural networks.

From a still-kind-of-science-but-what-does-that-mean-to-me perspective, this is a big deal because the results show that stable training of neural networks through reinforcement learning is possible with both value-based and policy-based methods, off-policy as well as on-policy methods, and in discrete as well as continuous domains. The experiments tested for the paper were just to show the proof of their concept. By combining other existing reinforcement learning methods or recent advances in deep reinforcements learning with asynchronous framework presents many possibilities for immediate improvements to the methods they presented. Basically, the team just made AI go from a pre-teen to a teenager and gave the blueprint for how it can head off to college to grow into a gracious and generous AI ruler who remembers, and rewards, the people that spoke positively about it during it’s awkward stages of puberty.

PS – In analyzing the data results in the paper, several data points were measured against a human (how well the human scored vs. the machine plotted over time) and it occurred to me that someone’s job at Google DeepMind is to play Atari 2600 video games for many, many hours on end. This really should be written like, GETS TO PLAY VIDEO GAMES. On the incredibly off-chance that anyone at Google DeepMind reads this, please keep me in mind for future reinforcement learning projects that involve humans playing video games. I assure you that I will put in as many hours as necessary to help you in the name of science. Thank you.


 About The Author

thomas-thompson-headshot

A STEM (Science / Technology / Engineering / Math) graduate and COO of bloomfield knoble, Thomas exemplifies the view that advertising is becoming an engineering discipline. He leads the integrated insights and strategic planning group in a way consistent with bloomfield knoble’s goal of bringing a strong analytical foundation to uncover fresh and innovative insights and business opportunities.
Connect With Thomas J Thompson
twitter
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# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.