Tag: social media

27 May 2016
brd-moody-graphic

Twitter Character Count: Much A-Twitter About Nothing?

Wiser words were never said.
Wiser words were never said.

Make no mistake, Twitter is my favorite social network. Facebook feels like a guilty pleasure (why am I stalking friends while they’re on vacation?). LinkedIn is, frankly, a snooze. And I’m not enough of a shutterbug to get a lot of use out of Instagram or Snapchat. Twitter is just more … useful.

I get news, traffic, jokes, updates from organizations I’m involved with and little glimpses into (but not full-on photo essays on) the lives of friends. I find it’s the first place I go for breaking news nationally or locally. I’m just more likely to find what’s really going on, in real time, on Twitter than from a news outlet. When a temblor hits Irving, the first place I look to is my “Irving Earthquake” search term newsfeed to see if it was really a quake and verify the magnitude.

So you’d think I’d be more excited about the changes coming to the character limit than I am.

To catch you up – in a recent blog, Twitter announced the following:

“In the coming months we’ll make changes to simplify Tweets including what counts toward your 140 characters, so for instance, @names in replies and media attachments (like photos, GIFs, videos, and polls) will no longer “use up” valuable characters. Here’s what will change:

  • Replies: When replying to a Tweet, @names will no longer count toward the 140-character count. This will make having conversations on Twitter easier and more straightforward, no more penny-pinching your words to ensure they reach the whole group.
  • Media attachments: When you add attachments like photos, GIFs, videos, polls, or Quote Tweets, that media will no longer count as characters within your Tweet. More room for words!
  • Retweet and Quote Tweet yourself: We’ll be enabling the Retweet button on your own Tweets, so you can easily Retweet or Quote Tweet yourself when you want to share a new reflection or feel like a really good one went unnoticed.
  • Goodbye, .@: These changes will help simplify the rules around Tweets that start with a username. New Tweets that begin with a username will reach all your followers. (That means you’ll no longer have to use the “.@” convention, which people currently use to broadcast Tweets broadly.) If you want a reply to be seen by all your followers, you will be able to Retweet it to signal that you intend for it to be viewed more broadly.”

The big news here is the fact that attachments like images, videos, GIFs, polls and quote tweets no longer count as 24 characters. This is all well and good, and I’m happy to have the additional real estate to compose my thoughts. It seems more straightforward than trying to do math when planning to insert an image or video (ask anyone – nothing causes a dark cloud to creep over my face more than math).

But it’s not a game changer. I think individuals trying to compose a clever thought or update will get the most use out of the extra characters. But for companies who have been building their audience and engagement and adhering to best practices, this should have little impact.

Basically it boils down to brevity. The goal has always been to keep Tweets as short as possible. According to Twitter’s own research (via Buddy Media) Tweets shorter than 100 characters get a 17% higher engagement rate, so why would you want to go longer? Just because you have the extra space isn’t a reason to make your Tweets longer.

This change will only be a boon to the longwinded individual user who can now use the full 140 characters and still share the cat GIF they found on Reddit.

As they’ve done in the past with changes to the platform, Twitter may release a corresponding paid promotional feature that takes advantage of the new character count. That will certainly be something that bloomfield knoble will be watching out for, to consider for brands doing paid advertising. For now though, don’t look for brands to start telling you to buy their product or service using 24 additional characters.

 


 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
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# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

31 Mar 2016

What can Tay teach us about social media?

What, besides figuring out that trolls (some of whom work here at bloomfield knoble) rule the Internet, can Tay teach us about social media?

By now you’ve probably heard about the rise (and very dramatic fall) of Microsoft’s Tay, an artificially intelligent bot on Twitter. Microsoft was hoping to show off that it had made significant strides in the world of artificial intelligence while attempting to build a real understanding of how a specific subset of society interacts. Unfortunately for Microsoft, they didn’t actually create an AI, they simply created a chat bot – a program that repurposed the content it received in a way that would seem to emulate the subset of society it was trying to emulate (in this case, the personality of a teenage girl). The impact is that a chat bot doesn’t know “right” or “wrong” just nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc. For some unknown reason, Microsoft decided to let Tay learn courtesy of the interwebs – and the interwebs obliged in only the way the interwebs know how.

I’m not going to jump on the “how dumb are engineers at Microsoft for not knowing how the Internet works?” bandwagon (too easy), because we may have actually learned something very interesting from this experiment.

If you can analyze the sentiment of large-scale populations, then you can ensure that things like public policies are effective. In fact, a recent paper by Annabelle Wenas from the University of Indonesia titled Measuring happiness in large population addresses just this. She writes, 

“Governing complex modern societies requires some basic measurements in the societal level. These measurements will ensure that public policies are effective and meet the ever changing demand. However, currently, the most common aggregate measures of societies are economic measures such as economic growth. Yet, as modern societies grow more complex, there is a need to develop other measurements beyond economic measures especially for psychological measures that can capture subjective well-being. It is reasonable to think that a combination of economic and psychological measures can provide more comprehensive view of a society which, in turn, will be useful for formulating better public policies and their evaluations.”

Wenas proposes an approach to measure psychological characteristics for large populations based on text data (like Twitter). The authors also note that this concept isn’t exactly new, in fact, 

“Our focus is on the measurement of emotional states and we follow [J.A. Russell from Psychological Review] who asserted that emotion, mood and other emotionally charged events are states that are simply combinations between feeling good or bad and energized or worn out. Russell addressed these emotional states as core affect, and mapped its structure into circumplex model. Horizontal axis of circumplex model is valence, which is a measure of emotion ranging from negative to positive emotions. Whereas its vertical axis is arousal, a measure of emotional intensity. Thus, for example, anger is a negative emotion with high intensity and lethargic is a negative emotion with low intensity. On the other hand of the spectrum, excited and calm are positive emotions with high and low intensity respectively. Note that happiness is a positive emotion with moderate intensity.”

In a nutshell, the author scoured Twitter for keywords that generally reflect happiness and measured not only word valence, but also the measurement of arousal dimension. The reason to include arousal is because positive valence is necessary but not a sufficient component of happiness, because there are either states that have positive valence like excitement and calm. Thus, the level of arousal is the key to differentiate excitement, happiness and calm. Three of them indeed have positive valence, yet their arousal level are variable from high, moderate to low (respectively). The author provides the formula and proof of their test and admits that there approach has the potential to be used as a measure of emotions for large population in multi domains. Further development of their approach will include tests for sensitivity, robustness and also the inclusion of other psychological measures, such as moral judgments, values and personality.

So, what does a paper about studying happiness have to do with Tay? Nothing and everything. The concept behind Tay was, I suspect, not to generate an AI that can pass the Turing test, but rather a chat bot that would better understand a specific subset of culture. Understanding that subset of culture would help identify trends, patters, concepts and could then, theoretically, be used to identify future activity. IBM did something similar when Watson announced that SteamPunk was the next big thing. This concept – understanding and predicting – is what every agency (like bloomfield knoble) – is trying to achieve for clients. It’s why we spend so much time gathering and analyzing big data (yes, I said it) – we want to spend money where it will be most effective. Bottom line. And if a chat bot can learn enough about a specific subset to help us identify best use of ad dollars, then so be it. 


 About The Author

thomas-thompson-headshot

A STEM (Science / Technology / Engineering / Math) graduate and COO of bloomfield knoble, Thomas exemplifies the view that advertising is becoming an engineering discipline. He leads the integrated insights and strategic planning group in a way consistent with bloomfield knoble’s goal of bringing a strong analytical foundation to uncover fresh and innovative insights and business opportunities.
Connect With Thomas J Thompson
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# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

30 Jun 2015
twitterwhoops

Answer Twitter Questions Without Getting 'Jamesed'

twitterwhoopsYou may have seen that renowned and respected widely derided and somewhat filthy author E.L. James (Fifty Shades of Grey) held a Twitter Q&A for some reason yesterday. It unexpectedly (?) didn’t go well.

Users pounced, using the hashtag #AskELJames to ask pointed questions about her lack of writing skill, the misogynistic and sexually unhealthy themes in her books and ultimately, just the ludicrous idea that she thought it would go smoothly.

This may scare you off of the idea of hosting your own Twitter (or Reddit, or other social platform) Q&A, in which you or a representative of your company answer questions submitted by users on the social platform. But it doesn’t have to be so scary. Especially if you haven’t written a popular yet polarizing and much-ridiculed erotica book series.

At bloomfield knoble, we’ve helped clients large and small host successful Twitter Q&As, and presented here are some of the ways we help them achieve the goals of increased engagement, transparency and goodwill:

Avoid planning around other big news events the company’s involved in. This avoids being overshadowed by that event or having negative feedback that might unexpectedly be associated with it.

At least two weeks out, begin posting to your Twitter and other social accounts with the Q&A hashtag, establishing the host and topic and how to submit questions. Post twice a day leading up to the event to reach as many users as possible.

 If budget permits, pay to promote Tweets and Facebook posts to expand the reach. Set aside posts day-of to promote an hour before and then at the start time.

Have questions directed at a recognizable host figure or, alternately, establish the host as the leading expert on the topic prior to the Q&A.

Establish an appropriate hashtag that conveys the nature of the Q&A. Research that hashtag to ensure that it isn’t readily hijacked due to an inadvertently negative or suggestive double-meaning.

If the host or topic is not an established commodity that promises engagement (will users be motivated to put aside an hour of their day to log in and submit questions?), accept questions in advance using the hashtag and curate which will be answered during the established Q&A period.

Create a list of all the negative questions that you can conceive would be asked and be ready with a plan for how to address those issues. Some may best be ignored, but others might be legitimate and need an intelligent, strategically crafted response.

Provide the host or hosts with appropriate resources to answer questions. Once you’ve created your list of possible topics that might come up, both positive and negative, have links to appropriate resources ready for them to easily direct users to those resources.

Be prepared to take in-depth inquiries off-line. Prepare the wording in advance for how to shift those conversations to another venue.

Post-event, use the data gathered from the questions asked to develop content moving forward – blogs, tweets, etc.

For subsequent Q&As, analyze how users participated. If you receive more questions in advance and few during the hour, continue with that model. If more users logged in for the hour and submitted live questions, shift the focus to a live format in the future.

If only E.L. had come to us.


 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

 

30 Jun 2015
twitterwhoops

Answer Twitter Questions Without Getting ‘Jamesed’

twitterwhoopsYou may have seen that renowned and respected widely derided and somewhat filthy author E.L. James (Fifty Shades of Grey) held a Twitter Q&A for some reason yesterday. It unexpectedly (?) didn’t go well.

Users pounced, using the hashtag #AskELJames to ask pointed questions about her lack of writing skill, the misogynistic and sexually unhealthy themes in her books and ultimately, just the ludicrous idea that she thought it would go smoothly.

This may scare you off of the idea of hosting your own Twitter (or Reddit, or other social platform) Q&A, in which you or a representative of your company answer questions submitted by users on the social platform. But it doesn’t have to be so scary. Especially if you haven’t written a popular yet polarizing and much-ridiculed erotica book series.

At bloomfield knoble, we’ve helped clients large and small host successful Twitter Q&As, and presented here are some of the ways we help them achieve the goals of increased engagement, transparency and goodwill:

Avoid planning around other big news events the company’s involved in. This avoids being overshadowed by that event or having negative feedback that might unexpectedly be associated with it.

At least two weeks out, begin posting to your Twitter and other social accounts with the Q&A hashtag, establishing the host and topic and how to submit questions. Post twice a day leading up to the event to reach as many users as possible.

 If budget permits, pay to promote Tweets and Facebook posts to expand the reach. Set aside posts day-of to promote an hour before and then at the start time.

Have questions directed at a recognizable host figure or, alternately, establish the host as the leading expert on the topic prior to the Q&A.

Establish an appropriate hashtag that conveys the nature of the Q&A. Research that hashtag to ensure that it isn’t readily hijacked due to an inadvertently negative or suggestive double-meaning.

If the host or topic is not an established commodity that promises engagement (will users be motivated to put aside an hour of their day to log in and submit questions?), accept questions in advance using the hashtag and curate which will be answered during the established Q&A period.

Create a list of all the negative questions that you can conceive would be asked and be ready with a plan for how to address those issues. Some may best be ignored, but others might be legitimate and need an intelligent, strategically crafted response.

Provide the host or hosts with appropriate resources to answer questions. Once you’ve created your list of possible topics that might come up, both positive and negative, have links to appropriate resources ready for them to easily direct users to those resources.

Be prepared to take in-depth inquiries off-line. Prepare the wording in advance for how to shift those conversations to another venue.

Post-event, use the data gathered from the questions asked to develop content moving forward – blogs, tweets, etc.

For subsequent Q&As, analyze how users participated. If you receive more questions in advance and few during the hour, continue with that model. If more users logged in for the hour and submitted live questions, shift the focus to a live format in the future.

If only E.L. had come to us.


 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

 

16 Jan 2015
Unknown

bloomfield knoble’s ‘We Care’ Initiative Is Designed To Make A Difference

Each year bloomfield knoble (bk) gives generously to various environmental and community organizations on a local and national level through its “We Care” program. The agency is proud to announce that its annual donations for 2015 have been made.

Unknown“Now the real work begins,” says agency partner Eric Hirschhorn. “We set a year-long calendar of effort to help deliver results to these groups. That’s why our program is unique. Nobody in our industry – or any industry I know of – has this type of program and history to commitment. We don’t just want to say we donated to a cause. We want to see the cause ‘win.’”

The organizations supported by bloomfield knoble through “We Care” include a variety of organizations ranging from conservation to special needs to fighting disease to access to freedom and information. In addition to financial contributions, bloomfield knoble engages in active social media monitoring, posting and promoting of these causes to increase public awareness and engagement. Pro bono design and consulting for organizations is provided, where it fits the need. The agency also encourages its staff and clients to take volunteer opportunities with these and other organizations.

Here are the 12 organizations the bk We Care program supports:

 

Each month the agency selects one of its 12 charitable causes or movements it has supported (in many cases for 10+ years) and provides pro bono awareness through its social media channels and other outreach initiatives. bk uses its social media expertise and website exposure to grow engagement with these organizations, to promote events/initiatives and fundraising.

Here are a couple of recent examples from 2015 where We Care has begun to promote the Electronics Takeback Coalition to launch the year of We Care support.

Screen Shot 2015-01-16 at 10.41.37 AM

Screen Shot 2015-01-16 at 10.55.19 AM
“It’s easy to just send a check and feel like you’ve contributed,” says Chris Weatherley, the agency’s other partner. “But we just don’t think that is enough. It’s the volunteering of our time and resources which helps make a difference. We want these important organizations to make a difference. That’s why we do this and share our story throughout the year.”

If you’re a charity and would like to be part of bk’s We Care initiative, use our contact form and mention “We Care” and Eric Hirschhorn will contact you.


 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

29 Sep 2014
network_theory

Why Network Theory Matters.

network_theoryWe have a great team here at bloomfield knoble. Each member of the team brings a unique perspective to the table regardless of what product or service we are offering to a client or brand. I have built personal and professional relationships with everyone here and, while I may not always agree with them, truly value their input as a variable in the decision-making process. However, the weight I give to each person’s input depends on the topic. For example, if the bloomfield knoble team is working on developing a logo for a brand, I will give more weight to the creative team than the finance team. I don’t do it to be prejudicial, it’s just how I interpret the value of comments from people I interact with.

If you think about it, you realize that you’ve been doing the same thing your entire life. You have had a series of teachers, tutors, mentors, whatever, shape the way you approach everything from solving a math problem to driving down the highway. At some point you took all of the lessons you learned and created your own identity – your own plan for solving problems and determining a course of action. You can still accept outside influence, but you’ve got a way you like to work and do things and you’re pretty sure you know what’s right for you.

At bloomfield knoble, like any agency, we’re doing our best to be an influence in the decision-making process. We work hard to generate awareness, drive engagement through education and provide a clear call-to-action (or incentive) to drive usage. It’s why there are TV ads, billboards, magazine ads, online banners and a million other messages that bombard us as consumers. What is relevant to one individual may not be relevant to someone else. The point is that advertising is trying to provide you with information (of a sort) to help you make a decision during the buying process and, ideally, it’s the product or service we’re trying to sell. Agencies work very hard to identify who you are as an individual, where you are in the buying process, and what might give you the greatest incentive to engage with our client. Agencies work very hard to build brand awareness, recognition, trust and loyalty and create a one-on-one relationship.

And here’s where it all goes out the window: welcome to network theory.

In a nutshell, network theory is finding pathways and determining the influence of those pathways. There are different types of network theory, but I’m only going to talk about social network theory. The bottom line is this: the people with whom we interact on a regular basis, and some with who we interact only sporadically, influence our beliefs, decisions and behaviors. If you want to really understand this concept, I highly recommend An Overview of Social Networks and Economic Applications by Matthew O. Jackson, written for the Handbook of Social Economics.

What does that mean to us as advertisers? It means that all the hard work we put into creating awareness, attitude and usage when building brand essence doesn’t mean squat if we can’t control the other connections that people use as part of their decision-making process. This is an impactful statement and is already changing the way every agency and brand does business, so let it sink in for a second.

Let me give you an example of network theory at work. A young couple is shopping and decide to grab a bite to eat. There are many restaurants around them, but none where the couple has eaten before. Thanks to advertising, there is some awareness of their choices. From an agency perspective, the hope is that the couple recall a particular ad or incentive tied to an ad to make a decision. Each restaurant in the area has spent money to capture attention and provide a point of difference versus the competition (come eat pizza – come eat chicken) and, ideally, the people will use their knowledge of the restaurants – provided via advertising – to make a selection. So what happens? One person pulls out a phone and opens Yelp. Now, people whom the couple have never met are influencing the decision-making process. It doesn’t matter that the brand has built a one-on-one connection via their marketing efforts; someone else – not even remotely associated with the couple – have driven the couple to (great place to eat review) or away (worst place ever review).

Understanding this process – the concept of network theory – is changing everything. It’s not just social media – it’s deeper than that. It’s understanding the core functions and concepts behind why we, as consumers, accept influence from people we don’t know. Understanding at least the idea behind network theory is the only way we as an agency can truly develop a strategy that will help clients maximize the impact that channels, like social networks, can have on brand essence. There are plenty of agencies that promote relationship management or content development, but that’s being reactive to the channel – not the underlying cause. It’s the difference between taking medicine to stop a stomach ache and understanding what is causing the stomach ache in the first place. It’s why movie trailers still feature comments from critics and it’s why TV shows now put comments collected from Twitter in their ads.

Network Theory is changing the very way agencies do business. Are you ready?


 About The Author

thomas-thompson-headshot

A STEM (Science / Technology / Engineering / Math) graduate and COO of bloomfield knoble, Thomas exemplifies the view that advertising is becoming an engineering discipline. He leads the integrated insights and strategic planning group in a way consistent with bloomfield knoble’s goal of bringing a strong analytical foundation to uncover fresh and innovative insights and business opportunities.
Connect With Thomas J Thompson
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

05 Sep 2014
Twitter_logo_blue

Three Things You Didn't Know You Could Do On Twitter

Twitter is what you make of it. If you’ve ever heard anyone say that they think Twitter is useless, it means they haven’t spent much time on it, or worse, they’ve followed people or organizations who aren’t tweeting anything of any interest to them and haven’t reached out to build their own follower baseTwitter_logo_blue.

Besides turning off mobile alerts for Twitter, the first thing novice users should learn to do is curate their following list. Cull the disappointments, and check out recommended accounts for new information (and think about what you’re interested in or what you’re trying to achieve business-wise in the real world, and follow those people or companies).

But if you’re past that point and working your way to becoming a true Twitter power user and marketer, here are a few things you might not have known you can do on Twitter to get the most out of it personally and professionally.

Filter Your Search

You can filter your search so that instead of everything on Twitter that relates to your search terms, you only see a list of Twitter accounts that feature your search terms, tweets with photos or video or news. This is useful when searching a newsfeed for a topic like “Star Wars.” If you only want to see the latest images or videos from the newest Star Wars projects, you could filter for photos or videos. But if you only wanted hard news , you can filter for news (although, let’s be honest, reading news about Star Wars is like reading news about Apple – it’s mostly rumors and hearsay until the actual release).

If you need more detailed search filtering, there’s Twitter’s powerful Advanced Search feature. You can include or exclude keywords, filter for dates, specific users and even sentiment.

Now, don’t you feel silly every time you cursed the useless results you got when you just typed in a keyword and got back a bunch of nonsense tweets from people whose expertise was questionable or useless? These search tools will definitely help you find what you’re looking for on the platform.

Subscribe to Other Users’ Public Lists

Want to raise your visibility to specific targeted groups? Start subscribing to the lists of thought leaders in the areas important to you or your company.

To join someone else’s public list, go to their profile and click “lists” under “more.” Choose what list of theirs you’d like to subscribe to, and click “Subscribe.” Joining lists does two awesome things:

1) Gives you theme-specific feed information

2) Gets you exposure, especially if you’re wanting more visibility in a specific industry

You don’t even have to be following that user to subscribe to their lists.

Give Other Users Administrative Rights

If you’re planning on promoting your tweets and you’re managing the Twitter account for your company, it might make sense to provide employees access to your Twitter account.

This is a pretty new feature, and addresses one of users’ main requests for business accounts. Rather than having to log into different accounts to manage ad features, now Twitter has come one step closer to Facebook’s Pages model, which allows seamless switching from account to account.

To assign other users access to your ad account, navigate to ads.twitter.com while logged in as the master account, then in the drop-down under the account name at the top, select “Edit Access to Account.” This gives you the option to assign roles:

Account Administrator – full access, including the ability to add/remove users

Ad Manager – full access to modify ad campaigns and view data

Analyst – access to view analytics, but no access to campaigns

These levels of administrative rights only apply to ad campaigns, and do not provide access to compose messages on behalf of the company, so it’s not quite the level of Facebook’s Pages integration, but it’s closer. Besides, with so many tools available to manage multiple accounts, including Twitter’s own TweetDeck, they’re pretty close to being there anyway.

Allowing access to ad campaigns lets the marketing people or the people with the purse-strings manage the campaigns and payments while the content people can focus on content. This is especially handy for agencies to be able to manage ad campaigns for a client who manages their own Twitter account. At bloomfield knoble, we do this for a variety of clients.

Larry Bird

And here’s one bonus bit of Twitter knowledge: The official name of Twitter’s bird is Larry. That’s right. The little blue logo is Larry Bird.

I hope these tips help you manage your Twitter account more effectively and efficiently. If you’ve got some tips of your own, please share in the comments.

About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

 

05 Sep 2014
Twitter_logo_blue

Three Things You Didn’t Know You Could Do On Twitter

Twitter is what you make of it. If you’ve ever heard anyone say that they think Twitter is useless, it means they haven’t spent much time on it, or worse, they’ve followed people or organizations who aren’t tweeting anything of any interest to them and haven’t reached out to build their own follower baseTwitter_logo_blue.

Besides turning off mobile alerts for Twitter, the first thing novice users should learn to do is curate their following list. Cull the disappointments, and check out recommended accounts for new information (and think about what you’re interested in or what you’re trying to achieve business-wise in the real world, and follow those people or companies).

But if you’re past that point and working your way to becoming a true Twitter power user and marketer, here are a few things you might not have known you can do on Twitter to get the most out of it personally and professionally.

Filter Your Search

You can filter your search so that instead of everything on Twitter that relates to your search terms, you only see a list of Twitter accounts that feature your search terms, tweets with photos or video or news. This is useful when searching a newsfeed for a topic like “Star Wars.” If you only want to see the latest images or videos from the newest Star Wars projects, you could filter for photos or videos. But if you only wanted hard news , you can filter for news (although, let’s be honest, reading news about Star Wars is like reading news about Apple – it’s mostly rumors and hearsay until the actual release).

If you need more detailed search filtering, there’s Twitter’s powerful Advanced Search feature. You can include or exclude keywords, filter for dates, specific users and even sentiment.

Now, don’t you feel silly every time you cursed the useless results you got when you just typed in a keyword and got back a bunch of nonsense tweets from people whose expertise was questionable or useless? These search tools will definitely help you find what you’re looking for on the platform.

Subscribe to Other Users’ Public Lists

Want to raise your visibility to specific targeted groups? Start subscribing to the lists of thought leaders in the areas important to you or your company.

To join someone else’s public list, go to their profile and click “lists” under “more.” Choose what list of theirs you’d like to subscribe to, and click “Subscribe.” Joining lists does two awesome things:

1) Gives you theme-specific feed information

2) Gets you exposure, especially if you’re wanting more visibility in a specific industry

You don’t even have to be following that user to subscribe to their lists.

Give Other Users Administrative Rights

If you’re planning on promoting your tweets and you’re managing the Twitter account for your company, it might make sense to provide employees access to your Twitter account.

This is a pretty new feature, and addresses one of users’ main requests for business accounts. Rather than having to log into different accounts to manage ad features, now Twitter has come one step closer to Facebook’s Pages model, which allows seamless switching from account to account.

To assign other users access to your ad account, navigate to ads.twitter.com while logged in as the master account, then in the drop-down under the account name at the top, select “Edit Access to Account.” This gives you the option to assign roles:

Account Administrator – full access, including the ability to add/remove users

Ad Manager – full access to modify ad campaigns and view data

Analyst – access to view analytics, but no access to campaigns

These levels of administrative rights only apply to ad campaigns, and do not provide access to compose messages on behalf of the company, so it’s not quite the level of Facebook’s Pages integration, but it’s closer. Besides, with so many tools available to manage multiple accounts, including Twitter’s own TweetDeck, they’re pretty close to being there anyway.

Allowing access to ad campaigns lets the marketing people or the people with the purse-strings manage the campaigns and payments while the content people can focus on content. This is especially handy for agencies to be able to manage ad campaigns for a client who manages their own Twitter account. At bloomfield knoble, we do this for a variety of clients.

Larry Bird

And here’s one bonus bit of Twitter knowledge: The official name of Twitter’s bird is Larry. That’s right. The little blue logo is Larry Bird.

I hope these tips help you manage your Twitter account more effectively and efficiently. If you’ve got some tips of your own, please share in the comments.

About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

 

27 Jun 2014
identity-theft

Business Identity Crisis?

What would you do if you owned a moving company and had been building a respected professional reputation for years, then discovered that there were bad reviews percolating up on websites like Yelp! and Facebook?

You’d be concerned, of course, because you don’t want your customers to have a bad experience, and of course you don’t want bad reviews driving other customers away. You’d want to fix it.

But now imagine that in your investigation you discover the writers of the bad reviews weren’t even your customers. What gives? Are people writing fake negative reviews?

identity-theft
With only a slight name change, this virtually happened to our client. Fortunately, we were there to help them fix it.

No, you discover. After noticing a frequent “typo” referring to your company by a similar but different name (one word off, but still the same meaning) you realize you have a doppelgänger company and their customers are erroneously posting to your review pages.

But wait. When you dig a little deeper, you realize it’s not just a simple misunderstanding. The owner of this company is intentionally sending his users to your Yelp! page, as well as your A+ ranked Better Business Bureau page. And why wouldn’t they? Their BBB page shows an F ranking.

They need to stop. So you call a lawyer and talk to your marketing folks. That’s where the fun begins. They discover that not only does this other company try to cover up its mistakes by using your company review sites and BBB page, but the owner has a criminal record and lies about his military service. They use falsified certifications to operate, do not have a USDOT number despite operating moving trucks, and have failed to register and insure two of three of those trucks.

As you may have guessed, this is not a hypothetical. This happened to our client, Dallas Move Masters. bloomfield knoble designed their website and developed graphics for their social media pages and provide ongoing marketing consulting for them.

Fortunately for Dallas Move Masters, we also know how to handle a situation like this. We immediately created a series of posts that they could utilize in order to manage their reputation and get the word out about the deception perpetrated by the other company.

bloomfield knoble also devised a campaign to promote the goodwill of Dallas Move Masters, offering a discount to victims of the other company’s poor service.

Additionally, we updated the information on important review sites like Yelp! to indicate the discrepancy between the two in order to keep the other company’s customers from posting inaccurate reviews.

Through that reputation management process, which is ongoing, we’ve been able to get the word out to Dallas Move Masters’ followers that they are not the other, similarly named, company, resulting in more sharing and reposting of this story to spread the word.

Dallas Move Masters is an honest company run by a Dallas fireman. They take great pride in their work and we’re proud to call them a client. We hope that our efforts to provide the public with the real story will put an end to the questionable behavior of another business shamefully leeching off of their good name.

Reputation management is not simply about releasing a single statement to the public, but rather requires a steady flow of information telling your story. The more likely your target audience is to stumble across that story, the more likely they are to share it, whether through social media or through old fashioned word of mouth. Then more of the public will have the true story. Your story.

 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
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# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

 

22 May 2014
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Are You Ready for Your New Twitter Profile?

bloomfield knoble helps companies make the best of changes like these.
Trying to figure out how to make the best use out of new features like Twitter’s wider header image?

On Facebook, each of your friends has most likely visited your profile page once – when trying to decide to Friend you or not. If it’s an ex, the frequency is greater – obviously in an attempt to see who you’re dating now to make sure you’ve moved on and are happy hoping to God that it’s a downgrade from themselves.

On Twitter, odds are nobody but you has ever visited your profile. But nonetheless, Twitter has updated its profile page – visually and functionally. Are you ready? You have until the mandatory switchover on May 28 to update the profile header image.

One of the things we focus on at bloomfield knoble, inc. is making sure our clients are always the prettiest girl at the dance. Keeping up with changes like this is part and parcel of that job.

Here’s what’s changed and some tips on making the most out of the new changes:

  • Larger profile photos. They’re now 400 pixels by 400 pixels, the same aspect ratio as before but with larger dimensions.
  • Customizable header image. This main image spans the browser, and users are encouraged to upload a 1500 pixel by 500 pixel image. Your current header image might fit, but the bigger scale might make it look a little fuzzy. Note that there are vast differences between how the images appear on mobile devices and desktops, so check all your devices before locking in on your image.
  • Best tweets. Your tweets with the most engagement will appear in a larger text size inside your stream.
  • Pinned tweet. You can now pin one of your favorite tweets to the top of your profile page. A very Facebook move.
  • Filtered views. When visiting someone else’s profile, you can choose how to view their tweets: tweets only, tweets plus replies, or tweets with photos or videos.
  • There’s also now a Pinterest-style grid view of your followers, who you’re following, and your visual content.

This is all a move to make what you see when you log into Twitter more visually appealing. Personally, I find the larger text for more popular tweets handy, after at first being confused by it. The new aspect ratio of the profile header seems prohibitive, but with a little effort, having a picture that works in that space is fairly stunning.

To make the most of these changes, get more visual. It’s long been known that posts with images get more Retweets, and that trend is likely to continue with this more visual redesign. Users have easier access to your visual content (if they visit your profile), so keep on being visual – photos, infographics, charts, whatever helps convey your point and stands out.

Be aware that there’s also easier access for visitors to view your Favorites. How have you been using that feature? Bookmark? The equivalent of a Facebook “Like”? A way to communicate to your followers that this is worthy of attention but not worthy of a Retweet? It seems like everyone uses it differently. Now it’s easier for others to see what you’ve favorited, so be sure you’re making the best use out of the feature.

But mainly, it’s the header image. The much wider aspect ratio completely changes how your header image is presented. As you play around with it, you’ll discover that many images that look like they’d work great (and particularly those that worked before) absolutely do not. But through trial and error you’ll find the right one.

One more fairly minor, unannounced change, is that he background image that used to appear behind your newsfeed is gone. It’s still visible in areas of your profile only accessible to you, but third party users who visit your profile no longer see that image. It will probably be phased out altogether in a future update.

If you manage a page for a business, keeping up with these changes is critical. If you’re just a personal Tweeter, hopefully this information will help you engage more friends … and finally get a RT from that celebrity you’ve been @ mentioning all these years.

At bk, we’ve helped companies ranging from mom and pop shops to Fortune 10 organizations build social presences that have shaped their business and public perception. Part of that is staying on top of trends, updates and changes in the industry.


 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.