Braess’s Paradox and Experiential Marketing

Braess’s paradox states that adding extra capacity to a network, when the moving entities selfishly choose their route, can in some cases reduce overall performance.  This is because the Nash equilibrium of such a system is not necessarily optimal.  The paradox has generally been applied to traffic, but more and more agencies are finding that

Braess's Paradox and Experiential Marketing

Braess’s paradox states that adding extra capacity to a network, when the moving entities selfishly choose their route, can in some cases reduce overall performance.  This is because the Nash equilibrium of such a system is not necessarily optimal.  The paradox has generally been applied to traffic, but more and more agencies are finding that

Is Google about to become your significant other?

Have you ever met one of those couples who always finish each other’s sentences?  Like me, you may find it incredibly annoying, but the ability to do that is based on shared experiences, intimacy and the ability to predict outcome based on previous behavior.  Intimacy forged during relationship building can also lead to a certain

The relevancy of understanding the client’s viewpoint

I am a big believer in communication.  I’m not writing about marketing/advertising when I make this first reference. I am writing about in life, in general, in everything. Too often, too much is left unsaid. Or, like a young child afraid to ask questions in front of peers, we leave too much un-asked. The point

The relevancy of understanding the client's viewpoint

I am a big believer in communication.  I’m not writing about marketing/advertising when I make this first reference. I am writing about in life, in general, in everything. Too often, too much is left unsaid. Or, like a young child afraid to ask questions in front of peers, we leave too much un-asked. The point

It’s not just what we say, it’s how we say it.

Want to know how a Japanese person is feeling? Pay attention to the tone of his voice, not his face. That’s what other Japanese people would do, anyway. A new study examines how Dutch and Japanese people assess others’ emotions and finds that Dutch people pay attention to the facial expression more than Japanese people