Category: Uncategorized

11 Feb 2015
Meet bk's new East Coast Director of Business Development, Michael Fabrikant.

bk Expands to East Coast with D.C. Hires

Usually I have an issue I have been thinking about for some time, so when it comes to my blog, I just kind of let it flow. It is not often that I don’t have much rattling around in my head. But right now, bloomfield knoble (bk) is, as is said in the restaurant biz, really “in the weeds.” Meaning we are busy, busy, busy. With national media campaigns kicking off, new clients being on-boarded by going through our RUDE process, digital launches and various projects, it does not leave a lot of time for introspection.

Luckily, I did not need to come up with a great topic because we do have some interesting news: bk has expanded to Washington, D.C. That’s right, we have two full-time representatives now in DC and we could not be more excited.

Meet bk's new East Coast Director of Business Development, Michael Fabrikant.
Meet bk’s new East Coast Director of Business Development, Michael Fabrikant.

Agency partner Chris Weatherley and I started planning this expansion in 2013. We targeted 2015 for several reasons, chief among them was timing. Over the last 3 years as we have expanded our services to government department prospects, we discovered we needed to apply and receive different levels of status to be considered. What started in 2012 as a gleam in our eye is today an executional opportunity. Our GSA contract is under final review and our retail client growth doubled on the East Coast since 2012. While expansion is the dream of every agency founder/owner/partner, launching the effort prior to having the proper paperwork, licenses, approvals, etc. would have been an error. We can honestly say we have sharpened our axe and are ready to go to work with a greater chance of success by patiently planning and building.

It is not easy to wait, however. Expansion of one’s business is the dream of every company. Growth means opportunity. Opportunity is the life blood of any business, especially advertising agencies. When I say expansion, I do no mean just with clients. Rather, I mean it in terms of geography. It is one thing to have national clients. It is another to have trained, professional representatives to introduce our business and grow the business daily. To have good people that can manage and work with prospective clients on a daily, eye-to-eye basis is what we have sought for 3 years. That is where we find ourselves in Washington, D.C, today.

We chose DC because we have a strong footprint there and have identified key opportunities. Also, we just love it up there. We have built some wonderful friendships with our current client partners and we want to stay in touch by becoming locals, so to speak. After 8 years of traveling up there at least 8 times a year, founding a DC satellite was an obvious choice.

The hard part? Well, that was finding the right individuals to represent us to the level bk has come to be viewed. After running through numerous resumes, conducting 3 rounds of interviews in DC and Dallas, we finally settled on our team. So it’s time to introduce our new East Coast Director of Business Development, Michael Fabrikant. Michael is a DC native and more recently worked as a public servant serving the people of Washington, D.C. He understands what it means to work hard to meet a goal and his personal ethic matches ours at bk. We look forward to Michael leading the expansion of our agency in DC and across the East Coast. Please join us and congratulate him on his new, important position.

Our goal in DC is to expand  and add more personnel beyond Michael and his recent new hire. But a wise agency mixes bold and caution together and sticks to its goal-based strategic plan – just as we advise our clients. (I do not introduce our other business development rep at this stage to allow him to wrap up other professional loose ends first. Look for an announcement next month.) (That mix has lead to nearly 20 years of successful business.)

If you would like to introduce yourself, please contact him at our main number 214-220-3701 ext THREE-EIGHT-ZERO-NINE.

 


 About The Author

clark-bachelot-headshotEric J. Hirschhorn is a principal at bloomfield knoble. For 17 years he has helped lead the Dallas-based advertising agency from start up to becoming a premier, full-service agency whose clients include some of the most influential companies in America. Eric lives to spend time with his family, to work and to travel the world in search of unique fishing adventures.

Connect With Eric Hirschhorn
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# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

 

31 Dec 2014
newyear-thumbnail

Happy New Year from bk

From everyone here at bloomfield knoble, we wish you a very happy holiday season as well as a safe and prosperous New Year.


 About The Author

andy-edwards-headshot

Andy Edwards is an Associate Art Director with bloomfield knoble. His interests include shredding on the guitar, pumping iron and, of course, beer. At bk, he is the wearer of many “hats” (figuratively, not literally, of course), in which he especially contributes his creative eye to design and video production. The Force is strong with him.
Connect With Andy Edwards
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# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

21 Oct 2014
HiRes

What The Growing Popularity In “Phablets” Means For Mobile Design

For the past few years the growing trend in “phablets” has had a noticeable effect on web design. Although phablets have only accounted for 2% of all smartphones shipped globally, this still amounted to around 20 million devices. Additionally that number is set to jump to 10% within the next 18 months with the help of the new iPhone 6 Plus.

So what does this mean for designers? Strictly speaking this means that the push to responsive versus adaptive design is more important than ever. While adaptive design does have its place, new websites built from the ground up should be designed as responsive as changing site structure at a later date will be more difficult.

While some designers may think that the introduction of the phablet just means adding another break point in your media queries, the truth is much deeper. With screen sizes ranging anywhere between 5 – 7 inches, designers have yet another platform to consider when deciding what content the user wants readily available at this new screen size.

Phablets fit really well into current design trends. With more people seeking open minimalist designs, the phablet can let your design breath and not feel as constricted as the smaller smart phones we are used to designing for.

 


 About The Author

clark-bachelot-headshot

Clark Bachelot is an Associate Creative Director with bloomfield knoble. His passions include cajun cooking, the outdoors and beer. In his role at bk, he likes to inspire audiences with his design and focuses on “usability” to make sure the targets of his creative understand what action to take. He is not very good at Fantasy Football.
Connect With Clark Bachelot
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# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Las Colinas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

17 Oct 2014
Laura Rivas
Candlewick Press

Children’s Book Publisher Dedicated to Marketing Children’s Books in New Ways

Laura Rivas Candlewick Press
Laura Rivas
Candlewick Press

I had the pleasure of spending some time speaking to Laura Rivas, Publicity, Brands and Consumer Outreach Director with Candlewick Press. Candlewick Press is an unusual entity in the world of children’s book publishing. They are an independent publishing house and are employee-owned.  Candlewick and its sister companies in the United Kingdom and Australia make up the Walker Books Group. Candlewick and its sister companies do one thing and only one thing – books for young readers.

In full disclosure, I should let you know that Laura and I worked together on a recent promotion with one of the many well known characters in Candlewick’s list of children’s books. Laura and I worked on a project with Borden Dairy on a summer promotion with Megan McDonald’s title character, Judy Moody. It was a lot of fun putting that promotion together and I would like to share more about Laura and her role at Candlewick with you.

Q. What is your role at Candlewick Press?

A. As Publicity, Brands, and Consumer Outreach Director I work with my colleagues on the Marketing and Publicity team to spread the word about our books to both the book trade and consumers.

 

Q.  Do you have specific brands or titles you work with?

Stink_10th_logo[1]

A. I work with a number of Candlewick authors and illustrators as well as handle some of Candlewick’s key properties such as Judy Moody and her brother Stink. In fact it is going to be a big year for Stink Moody in 2015; we’ll celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Stink series in the spring so we have a lot of marketing plans in the works. Each and every year, new and exciting materials come our way; it could be a fun new title within an already established brand or a completely new property with a lot of potential that we have the opportunity to develop and market.

 

Q. What’s it like working within an employee-owned organization?  Do you think you hire or recruit differently because you are a private company?

A. I suspect people at Candlewick feel a responsibility to the company and our co-workers more strongly than at other organizations because we are employee-owned. I enjoy that we are independent and have freedom to be creative and explore new approaches to working with our books. Also, because there are only 90 employees at Candlewick, I can easily see the people I need to work with to move a project along every day. That said, I started working here right out of college so I don’t have experience at a publicly traded organization for comparison.

 

Q. What is Candlewick Press’s target audience?

A. We sell children’s books for readers of all ages, from the youngest reader of board books to young adult readers. Our audience reaches well into adulthood.

 

Q. How do you determine the best plan of action for each of your properties?

A. That is part of the fun of this business! We craft marketing plans designed to reach the specific readers and consumers of our books. For board books and picture books, for instance, we are often trying to connect with parents through advertising, events, media coverage, social media channels, etc. For a young adult novel on the other hand, we will have a very different plan of action, because we will frequently work to reach teens directly.

 

Q. What types of marketing do you do for your books or characters?

A. I work on marketing our books both to the book trade and to consumers. We have additional marketing teams at Candlewick that focus on schools and libraries.

 

Q. How do you market to the trade?

A. We attend book trade shows, such as Book Expo America where publishers, booksellers, librarians, authors and illustrators all come together. In addition, our books are exhibited at regional tradeshows each year.  We also work closely with trade journals such as Publishers Weekly and Shelf Awareness. And a crossover method is working with bloggers.  There are some very passionate and knowledgeable book bloggers that address the trade and the consumer alike.

 

Q. How do you market to the consumer?

A. On the consumer side of the business we also work with bloggers, for example we do a lot of outreach to parenting/mommy bloggers. We also work extensively with consumer media such as magazines, radio, TV, newspapers and online outlets.  Book signing events with authors and illustrators can be very successful in connecting directly with readers. On any given weekend we may have up to a dozen book signings happening around the country, at bookstores, libraries, and festivals. Generally Spring and Fall are the busiest seasons for author appearances.  We have also found social media to be very important in the introduction of a new book or new author, and we have a team devoted to Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, FourSquare and everything social media related.

 

Q. How has the e-reader changed your business? Is it different or the same as e-reader publishing in non-children’s books?

A.  E-readers are an exciting realm for children’s books. Especially as the picture quality on e-reader devices has improved, e-readers are providing new opportunities for illustrated books, in addition to our fiction titles. Also, we can now enhance e-books with extra bells and whistles and that is an area that we look forward to continuing to explore. E-readers are a new way to read, but interestingly many people still return to the tactile elements of books, especially when it comes to children’s reading.  Think about the act of reading with your children:  there is connectivity in holding the book together, and lingering over the pages while snuggling with your children that somehow the e-reader can’t yet replicate. It’s that communal family activity that people often return to with printed books.

 

Q. Recently bloomfield knoble and Candlewick (you and I) worked on a really cool promotion with your Judy Moody and Stink properties and Borden Dairy. It was a really well-rounded promotion (if I do say so myself) that included: exclusive story written just for the Borden Dairy promotion, bloggers, internet advertising, paid advertising, trade advertising, trade publishing author interview, on-pack labeling, in-store floor and dairy case graphics, Candlewick and Borden newsletters, product sampling with handouts, social media, public relations, redeemable reading and activity materials and a sweepstakes for a hardback, autographed Judy Moody and Stink library. Do you do many of these promotions?

Summer 2014 Promotion Judy Moody & Borden Dairy
Summer 2014 Promotion
Judy Moody & Borden Dairy

 

A. We were delighted to work with Borden and bloomfield knoble on the Judy Moody summer reading promotion, and so pleased with the way the plans all came together to make a really big splash this summer. The promotion’s success is a testament to what can happen when different entities join forces wholeheartedly, sharing resources, insights, and ideas. We do work with third-parties on special promotions, though they’re often not as extensive as the Judy Moody summer reading promotion we did with Borden and bloomfield knoble. When a partnership makes sense it can be a wonderful tool for all organizations involved.

 

Q. What is your biggest frustration in this job?

A. Sometimes for whatever reason, we find a book that we have high hopes for just doesn’t take off in the way we would wish despite our best efforts. When you love a book and hope the world will come to love it as well, it can be a letdown when it doesn’t happen.

 

Q. What is your favorite part about your job?

A. I love the people I work with! My co-workers, and the authors and the illustrators I work with make my job a joy.

 

Q. You’ve spent your entire career at Candlewick. How has your job changed you, or your life changed your job?

A. I have a new perspective on my job now that I have a 2-year old daughter. I experience first-hand how impactful books can be on children and have a new appreciation that at Candlewick we bring together families through the power of story.

Thanks to Laura for her time. The passion for great children’s books really shows at Candlewick Press. The stories they bring to the world have an impact on so many families with children of all ages. I look forward to seeing what new properties they bring forward as I purchase classics and new books for my one-year old great-nephew and great-niece.


 About The Author

clark-bachelot-headshot

Luann Boggs is the Vice President of Business Development for bloomfield knoble. She works with new and existing accounts as a liaison between client and creative. Her favorite part of the job is meeting and working with interesting and intelligent people. Her personal interests are family, friends, good books and travel including all 50 states and over 25 countries.
Connect With Luann Boggs
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

17 Oct 2014
Laura Rivas
Candlewick Press

Children's Book Publisher Dedicated to Marketing Children's Books in New Ways

Laura Rivas Candlewick Press
Laura Rivas
Candlewick Press

I had the pleasure of spending some time speaking to Laura Rivas, Publicity, Brands and Consumer Outreach Director with Candlewick Press. Candlewick Press is an unusual entity in the world of children’s book publishing. They are an independent publishing house and are employee-owned.  Candlewick and its sister companies in the United Kingdom and Australia make up the Walker Books Group. Candlewick and its sister companies do one thing and only one thing – books for young readers.

In full disclosure, I should let you know that Laura and I worked together on a recent promotion with one of the many well known characters in Candlewick’s list of children’s books. Laura and I worked on a project with Borden Dairy on a summer promotion with Megan McDonald’s title character, Judy Moody. It was a lot of fun putting that promotion together and I would like to share more about Laura and her role at Candlewick with you.

Q. What is your role at Candlewick Press?

A. As Publicity, Brands, and Consumer Outreach Director I work with my colleagues on the Marketing and Publicity team to spread the word about our books to both the book trade and consumers.

 

Q.  Do you have specific brands or titles you work with?

Stink_10th_logo[1]

A. I work with a number of Candlewick authors and illustrators as well as handle some of Candlewick’s key properties such as Judy Moody and her brother Stink. In fact it is going to be a big year for Stink Moody in 2015; we’ll celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Stink series in the spring so we have a lot of marketing plans in the works. Each and every year, new and exciting materials come our way; it could be a fun new title within an already established brand or a completely new property with a lot of potential that we have the opportunity to develop and market.

 

Q. What’s it like working within an employee-owned organization?  Do you think you hire or recruit differently because you are a private company?

A. I suspect people at Candlewick feel a responsibility to the company and our co-workers more strongly than at other organizations because we are employee-owned. I enjoy that we are independent and have freedom to be creative and explore new approaches to working with our books. Also, because there are only 90 employees at Candlewick, I can easily see the people I need to work with to move a project along every day. That said, I started working here right out of college so I don’t have experience at a publicly traded organization for comparison.

 

Q. What is Candlewick Press’s target audience?

A. We sell children’s books for readers of all ages, from the youngest reader of board books to young adult readers. Our audience reaches well into adulthood.

 

Q. How do you determine the best plan of action for each of your properties?

A. That is part of the fun of this business! We craft marketing plans designed to reach the specific readers and consumers of our books. For board books and picture books, for instance, we are often trying to connect with parents through advertising, events, media coverage, social media channels, etc. For a young adult novel on the other hand, we will have a very different plan of action, because we will frequently work to reach teens directly.

 

Q. What types of marketing do you do for your books or characters?

A. I work on marketing our books both to the book trade and to consumers. We have additional marketing teams at Candlewick that focus on schools and libraries.

 

Q. How do you market to the trade?

A. We attend book trade shows, such as Book Expo America where publishers, booksellers, librarians, authors and illustrators all come together. In addition, our books are exhibited at regional tradeshows each year.  We also work closely with trade journals such as Publishers Weekly and Shelf Awareness. And a crossover method is working with bloggers.  There are some very passionate and knowledgeable book bloggers that address the trade and the consumer alike.

 

Q. How do you market to the consumer?

A. On the consumer side of the business we also work with bloggers, for example we do a lot of outreach to parenting/mommy bloggers. We also work extensively with consumer media such as magazines, radio, TV, newspapers and online outlets.  Book signing events with authors and illustrators can be very successful in connecting directly with readers. On any given weekend we may have up to a dozen book signings happening around the country, at bookstores, libraries, and festivals. Generally Spring and Fall are the busiest seasons for author appearances.  We have also found social media to be very important in the introduction of a new book or new author, and we have a team devoted to Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, FourSquare and everything social media related.

 

Q. How has the e-reader changed your business? Is it different or the same as e-reader publishing in non-children’s books?

A.  E-readers are an exciting realm for children’s books. Especially as the picture quality on e-reader devices has improved, e-readers are providing new opportunities for illustrated books, in addition to our fiction titles. Also, we can now enhance e-books with extra bells and whistles and that is an area that we look forward to continuing to explore. E-readers are a new way to read, but interestingly many people still return to the tactile elements of books, especially when it comes to children’s reading.  Think about the act of reading with your children:  there is connectivity in holding the book together, and lingering over the pages while snuggling with your children that somehow the e-reader can’t yet replicate. It’s that communal family activity that people often return to with printed books.

 

Q. Recently bloomfield knoble and Candlewick (you and I) worked on a really cool promotion with your Judy Moody and Stink properties and Borden Dairy. It was a really well-rounded promotion (if I do say so myself) that included: exclusive story written just for the Borden Dairy promotion, bloggers, internet advertising, paid advertising, trade advertising, trade publishing author interview, on-pack labeling, in-store floor and dairy case graphics, Candlewick and Borden newsletters, product sampling with handouts, social media, public relations, redeemable reading and activity materials and a sweepstakes for a hardback, autographed Judy Moody and Stink library. Do you do many of these promotions?

Summer 2014 Promotion Judy Moody & Borden Dairy
Summer 2014 Promotion
Judy Moody & Borden Dairy

 

A. We were delighted to work with Borden and bloomfield knoble on the Judy Moody summer reading promotion, and so pleased with the way the plans all came together to make a really big splash this summer. The promotion’s success is a testament to what can happen when different entities join forces wholeheartedly, sharing resources, insights, and ideas. We do work with third-parties on special promotions, though they’re often not as extensive as the Judy Moody summer reading promotion we did with Borden and bloomfield knoble. When a partnership makes sense it can be a wonderful tool for all organizations involved.

 

Q. What is your biggest frustration in this job?

A. Sometimes for whatever reason, we find a book that we have high hopes for just doesn’t take off in the way we would wish despite our best efforts. When you love a book and hope the world will come to love it as well, it can be a letdown when it doesn’t happen.

 

Q. What is your favorite part about your job?

A. I love the people I work with! My co-workers, and the authors and the illustrators I work with make my job a joy.

 

Q. You’ve spent your entire career at Candlewick. How has your job changed you, or your life changed your job?

A. I have a new perspective on my job now that I have a 2-year old daughter. I experience first-hand how impactful books can be on children and have a new appreciation that at Candlewick we bring together families through the power of story.

Thanks to Laura for her time. The passion for great children’s books really shows at Candlewick Press. The stories they bring to the world have an impact on so many families with children of all ages. I look forward to seeing what new properties they bring forward as I purchase classics and new books for my one-year old great-nephew and great-niece.


 About The Author

clark-bachelot-headshot

Luann Boggs is the Vice President of Business Development for bloomfield knoble. She works with new and existing accounts as a liaison between client and creative. Her favorite part of the job is meeting and working with interesting and intelligent people. Her personal interests are family, friends, good books and travel including all 50 states and over 25 countries.
Connect With Luann Boggs
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

23 Sep 2014
It's not like naval collaboration, but it's still collaboration.

Entering into collaboration as an honest partner has its rewards

“Splitting up the Pie,” as (they) say, is not easy. That is where collaboration between two or more companies usually falls apart. For nearly 20 years I have helped develop collaborative relationships to build business, portfolio, team skills and to broaden the breadth of this agency. It has, without a doubt, been one of the least rewarding tactics I have employed in terms of measuring success against effort. I relate it to the journey of finding the love of your life: You have to go through a lot of “crazy ones,” rejection, self illumination and then growth, as well as consternation and outright “failure to launch” before you actually find the right ONE(s).

In advertising circles, we must often collaborate whether we want to or not. Most clients have brand agencies or digital agencies or tactical agencies, etc. already engaged. Often we are brought in to collaborate and jump start what has gone stale, in some regards. So we are forced to collaborate with other teams that immediately feel territorial. That is totally understandable. In each instance, my goal is to get in as quickly as possible and try to get face time to make sure our intentions are understood. It is important that I get a good read on how defensive the other agency will or won’t be, then work to alleviate those fears by actions not words.

It's not like naval collaboration, but it's still collaboration.
It’s not like naval collaboration, but it’s still collaboration.

I have found that direct honesty is the only way to go when faced with these situations. “We aren’t here to replace anyone or make anyone look bad. We just want to help, and through our collaborative effort, get added to the roster and continue to work with you.” I absolutely mean that. That said, no one believes a word I say. It’s only our actions that will prove our intention. At bk, we adhere to the good Karma plan and strive to maintain honor in what is often a bit of a cutthroat game. We’ve been burned, of course. Not everyone plays that way. But that is to be expected. All we can do is stick to who and what we are and let our work and actions go before us.

Don’t get me wrong. If it’s a shoot out to earn business or an opportunity arises because a prospective client is unhappy with their current agency, we will go to battle. However, if working together is the requirement, we won’t be the bad guys. Ever.

Now that the premise is set, let me get into the good part about collaboration.

We have begun to work in a different category of collaboration. Since you read my blog each month (ahem!), I am certain you remember my last post was on how we are leading our agency into diversifying further and growing our government services niche. Well, now I am very thankful for all of the “on the job” training I have unknowingly had over the years by collaborating with other agencies on shared projects and clients. In the government services world, he who goes it alone often ends up alone  . . .  and out of work.

One smart thing I credit our leadership with (many others exist, but not going to brag) is we stick to what we are best at and don’t make it up with smoke and mirrors. We pride ourselves on being direct with our clients and letting them know what tactical services we do not offer. Generally these are technically-driven and we provide the strategy and goal for that tactical piece. We prefer to manage that piece in terms of helping point the cannon, but we let the experts in their field do their thing. Just as we request they let us do ours.

In collaborating in the government sector, it goes well beyond my simplistic explantation. In most instances, RFPs are convoluted with mixed specialty and HUB Zone requirements that one company simply cannot win on their own. So this has made an entire new network of needy friends out there to meet and collaborate with. One may have expertise with higher education clients, but not have effective digital strategy down. Or another may have superlative reporting and specialized accounting, but not analysis and research. Sill another may be in a specific HUB Zone, meaning they need capable friends outside their area they can trust and get in lock step to win the work.

What I have learned as we drive down this new course is that collaboration is even more dependent on honest approaches. To misrepresent your skill level or background is to put everyone at risk of missing out on opportunities, not to mention being able to deliver on promises. So by carefully networking, reaching out, going through deep discovery discussions we find other honest entrepreneurial spirits out there that just want to do good and be good at what they do. Very refreshing, indeed! I love when people work together to make a plan come together. Collaboration means new colleagues and friends, as well as new business and more opportunity. When done right,  collaboration rewards the company through necessity and reputation. If your reputation remains stellar and important to you, collaboration becomes a pipeline your business will enjoy through out its existence.

Call me up and let’s talk collaboration. You can reach me direct at 214-254-3805. I am open to talk and look forward to discover the ways we can work and grow together.


 About The Author

clark-bachelot-headshotEric J. Hirschhorn is a principal at bloomfield knoble. For 17 years he has helped lead the Dallas-based advertising agency from start up to becoming a premier, full-service agency whose clients include some of the most influential companies in America. Eric lives to spend time with his family, to work and to travel the world in search of unique fishing adventures.

Connect With Eric Hirschhorn
twitter
linkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

 

 

17 Sep 2014
fluor debbie sampson 6 14

Daughter of Small Business Owner is the Voice of Small Business at Fluor

While at a Department of Energy Small Business Forum this summer, I met Debra Sampson who is the small business liaison officer with Fluor. I was so impressed by how genuine she was in her approach to help small businesses that I really wanted to learn more about her background, the company and her position at Fluor.

Department of Energy Small Business Forum Exhibit Hall with Debra Sampson at the Fluor booth

There are huge private companies and government agencies that make it a business objective to do a fair percent of their business with companies that are certified as small businesses. I am lucky enough to work with bloomfield knoble and while we are a successful organization we are certified by the SBA as a small business. This designation opens some doors for us that I have enjoyed exploring. My conversation with Debbie was very enlightening. I hope you find it so as well.

 

Q. Can you tell me about Fluor? I know that it is an international company and huge but it’s not a publicly marketed organization so I don’t know much about it.

A. Fluor is a 100 year-old company. It is the largest publicly traded engineering, procurement and construction company in the U.S. We are not a household name; most people don’t know about us unless they work in facilities, construction or military base operations. We have 4 units and I work with the Federal Government Contracting group. We specialize in federal government contracts with agencies such as Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), Homeland Security, and FEMA. Fluor has over 40,000 employees and offices worldwide.

Military base in Afghanistan supported by Fluor

 

Q. What are some examples of contracts you support for Fluor in the Federal Government Contracting group?

A. We work on very large projects such as our Military Base Operations, which support the military with services that provide life support sustainability in places like Afghanistan and Africa. Those services include: Internet, dining, laundry, waste water management, heating and air conditioning, refrigeration and just about anything needed to allow our troops to complete their mission. Fluor supports FEMA when catastrophes hit anywhere in the U.S. An example of a service Fluor provides for the DOE is facilities decontamination and decommissioning. We rehabilitate decommissioned old nuclear sites by removing contaminated units without environmental impact during the process and turned one site into a beautiful park.

Fluor also provides construction on highly classified facilities. Very few contractors can do what we do.

 

Q. Tell me why Fluor works with Small Businesses.

A. Most government contracts we bid on require a specific percentage of the business be completed by small businesses. On the low end a contract could require 40% of the business be awarded to small business and on the high end it could be 80%. At Fluor our object is to exceed those goals. Over the last 3 years Fluor has awarded over $2.9 Billion US to small businesses to support our government contracts. That’s 53% of the dollars awarded to US companies. One of our recent projects had over 98% of the total contract allocated to small businesses. But the real answer to your question is Fluor works with small businesses because we find them to be highly skilled and extremely flexible. They can adjust and recover quickly with business changes.

 

Q. How long have you been with Fluor and how long in your job?

 A. I’ve been with Fluor for over ten years and in my job since 2009. I’m still very junior in this organization. We have many people who have been with the company for 20 years or more, one just celebrated 50 years with the company. We have such a diversity of jobs that it is easy for people to move to different departments or different locations worldwide and keep their work interesting.

 

Q. So, your job is similar to a matchmaker, right? How does that work? And how do you manage all the small businesses you need for your contracts?

A. Yes, I am the matchmaker between small business and the contract team. I start by reading through all contracts with the project team and we determine which pieces of the project can be allocated to small businesses. I then look through my database from the Fluor registry for qualifications. I’ve been in my job long enough to learn what companies have qualifications and past performance for the required tasks. However, I am always going to conferences, such as the DOE one where I met you, veteran owned business conferences and local events to assess new small businesses for skill sets needed for our contracts. I work to include as many companies as possible without providing false hope to people. I don’t want to waste small business owners’ time if we cannot use their skills.

 

Q. How did you get into your position with Fluor? And how many people are in your department?

 A. I am a department of one. I actually turned this job down when first offered to me. But my experience with government contracts and personal experience with family business was compelling enough to say yes to a second offer for this job. I am so glad I decided to accept in the end. When I first started in my job there was a less than positive opinion of working with small businesses. But over the years by working with highly performing companies that opinion is no longer prevalent.

 

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Over the last 3 years Fluor has awarded over $2.9 Billion US to small businesses to support government contracts.

Q. You seem to have such a genuine compassion for the small businesses you work with. Why do you think that is?

A. Well, odd that you ask. My father was a small business owner in Baton Rouge, LA and Fluor was one of his biggest clients. I know the life of a small business owner’s family. Our vacations were scheduled around projects and work he needed to manage if we were out of town. I understand the ups and downs of working on projects. I think that’s what gives me the understanding of how important Fluor can be for small business.

 

Q. What challenges do you face in your job today?

A. The biggest challenge is that we often help quality high performing companies outgrow their status as small businesses. It’s a wonderful thing but why I am always on the lookout for new small businesses. Often our partner businesses that are no longer small go on to mentor other small businesses and provide a path for success for other companies.

 

Q. What are your greatest satisfactions in your job?

A. I have the best job in Fluor. I have so much respect for the small business we work with. Without those resources we would not be as successful as we are. I get to work with some amazing and highly skilled people and watch their companies grow. We have a lot of people in our war zones staffed by U.S. military veterans with really relevant skills. It’s gratifying to see those businesses get engaged.

 

Thanks to Debbie for sharing information about her job and Fluor. Everyone at bloomfield knoble appreciates the service you provide to your company and small business like us. In your job you have a positive impact on a lot of individuals as well as Fluor and many small businesses. We wish you the best of luck in your ongoing search for qualified, high performing companies.

 About The Author

clark-bachelot-headshot

Luann Boggs is the Vice President of Business Development for bloomfield knoble. She works with new and existing accounts as a liaison between client and creative. Her favorite part of the job is meeting and working with interesting and intelligent people. Her personal interests are family, friends, good books and travel including all 50 states and over 25 countries.
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

21 Aug 2014
We were looking for an intern to help edit a video. We found Christian.

And Now, a Word from the Intern

We asked our summer intern, Christian Rusli, to write a blog summarizing his time here at bk and some of the lessons he learned while working with us. While we’re not sure about the “dysfunctional” part, we’re happy that he viewed his time here as being as valuable as we did.

***

I suppose it’s a little late for introductions seeing that in just a few days, I will no longer be working here, and that makes me sad. I’ll explain why, but first, I guess I should tell you who I am.  My name is Christian, I’m 18, and for the past few months, I’ve been bloomfield knoble’s resident intern. By the time you read (or skim, I won’t judge) this, I will be a freshman at the University of Texas at Austin majoring in Radio-Television-Film. I enjoy watching football, American football, and Formula 1, and I love trying new, interesting foods. Also otters, I love otters. Okay, so now that we have the boring stuff out of the way, I can delve into my real purpose of writing this blog post: remembering my time here at bloomfield knoble. Also, putting off packing for college. But that’s just an added bonus.

Over the past few months, I’ve had the privilege and the pleasure of working with the creative team here at bloomfield knoble, and I’ve learned and experienced a whole lot. It’s certainly been a journey, and I’m more than a little sad that it’s coming to an end.

Christian's last Fish City Friday
Christian’s last Fish City Friday

When I first walked through the door, I was nervous, and just between us, a little frightened too. This was my first internship and having heard and seen so many horror stories about the cruel and unusual things that interns are subject to, I didn’t know what to expect. But right off the bat, I was welcomed with open arms and treated (for the most part, I am still an intern) as an equal. Not limited to doing things like getting coffee or cleaning supply closets, I was given the opportunity to actually get involved in various projects around the office.

My main task was a fly fishing video, for one of bloomfield knoble’s clients, Temple Fork Outfitters. The goal of this project was to create a complete guide to the art and science of fly fishing. Doing so involved watching hours and hours of footage of all types of different casts, tips, and analysis. I reckon that I’m a better fly fisherman than a good number of people and I’ve never even held a fly rod. Also in editing this video, I was exposed to a whole host of programs I had never used before like Premiere, After Effects, and SpeedGrade. In this industry, learning things from a textbook will only get you so far, which is to say, not far at all, so having the opportunity to learn about editing hands-on has been invaluable. I’ve loved getting to apply my creative touch to the project instead of being handcuffed to a certain way it had to be.

In addition to the fly fishing video, I also got the chance to work on a short video for bloomfield knoble and I got to go on a video shoot for Nationstar Mortgage. All the work I’ve done here at bk are things that students my age don’t typically get to do until much later down the line.

And as much as I’ve loved the work that I do, I daresay I’ve loved the work that I don’t do just as much. The team here at bloomfield knoble are like a family. A weird, sort of dysfunctional family, but a family nonetheless. From afternoon Ping-Pong tournaments, to Fish City Fridays, to Rodeo Ball, and our very own Fantasy Football League, the office culture here is something that I will truly miss. Surely this isn’t the drab and dreary adulthood that I’ve been warned to prepare for all my life, right? At any rate, I thoroughly enjoyed every moment while it lasted.

In just a few short days, I’ll be packed up and headed off to UT, ready to start the adventure that is college, but I’ll never forget my time here at bk. I won’t forget the work that I did, the fun that I had, or the things that I learned. No, those are things that I’ll take with me down to Austin, then wherever else I go later in life. Because of my time here, I am now squarely ahead of the competition, and better prepared to start my future.

I’m starting to get a little misty eyed now so I think it’s time to wrap this blog up. Besides, I’ve got to finish packing now.

– Christian Rusli
University of Texas Class of 2018

***

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
Connect With Jeff Carrington
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# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

 

20 Aug 2014
Christian

The Trouble (and Rewards) with Interns

“Life is like a box of chocolates … you never know what you’re gonna git,”  Forrest Gump said his mother told him. Well, she could have been talking about interns in that metaphor, too.

Christian
Our latest intern, Christian Rusli.

In the world of advertising and marketing, interns are like the summer annual known as “lantana.” Around May they start showing up at all the nurseries and hardware stores, and they look good because they don’t need a lot of water and have a nice variety of colors. By the end of August, they can look a little ragged, you kind of get sick of them and you can’t wait to rip them out for something more fresh and useful.

Sounds harsh. Well, the truth hurts. You see, I was an intern once upon a time. I worked at a magazine called Monterey Life in Monterey, California. It was a great summer, which then turned into a Fall and Spring part time job my senior college year. I learned a great deal from those people and often wonder how they are all doing so many years later. It was learning the hard way – by direct experience. My editor was a strong person and she did not believe in special treatment for young people. I am certain that she drained a box of red pens on my first few articles. She left no punches unthrown, determined to make me a better writer by treating me like her most seasoned vets. Her staff of young artists and journalists took the same approach, although with a bit gentler handling. I often think of them all fondly.

So it is that our latest intern summer comes to an end here at bloomfield knoble. As I stated, we have hosted several interns over the past 15+ years or so of our program. In general, most of the interns are not helpful. In fact, they are a drag on the team. It is impossible to sift through them at first and pick which is likely to be useful and, more importantly, gain important skills and career – even life lessons – while they are here at bk. Our goal is always to find a mutual need and benefit for our program. Rarely is that goal met each summer.

The issue generally comes down to either their being too shy or too certain to be of any use. If an intern is uncertain of their ability to make a real contribution, they generally wait for direction and sit looking at their computer screen so as not to be a bother. Not useful! The opposite end is true, with some interns running through assignments quickly and then having to redo them constantly, never actually completing one to satisfaction. They don’t think anyone here has anything to offer them. I usually make sure they understand the public pool is hiring lifeguards and help them apply.

I have had an intern tell me they were “too good to answer telephones,” when asked to cover the front desk if the assistant was out. “Answering phones is beneath me,” he said. He stated that instead he should be working at the level of an Art Director. Well, I agreed that Art Directors are useless, so I showed him the same  door all “Art Directors” use around here – the Exit. We have had interns dress like they are going to a beach party, replete with flip flops and shorts. Then there are the interns that smoke more than they work. Or, of course, the social media interns that spend their time on SnapChat or FourSquare making friends. We make sure they “unfriend” us before turning off their wifi connection and showing them the jobs section on Monster. Immature. Boring. Quiet. Loud. You name it. Our experience should be a movie directed by John Waters or John Hughes. Just too much plot and lack of motivation to not be a great summer movie going experience.

So in 15+ years of our program, I would say 4 were of value, and of those 4, only 2 were exceptional. What made these 2 exceptional? Confidence. Not arrogance, but the ability to act like the adults they are and stand up to the personalities one might find in an advertising agency. Along with confidence, they had an easy humbleness paired with a desire to do well. These traits are special in an individual. It means you believe in yourself, but also know you are here to learn. You don’t run with it too far, and you don’t stand on your feet too long hoping no one will notice you are stuck on something. You just “feel” it and take advantage of a good thing.

Around here we have a simple directive – look it up on Google, ask friends and colleagues and if you still can’t figure it out, that’s why we are here, to teach you once you get stuck. Just take it as far as you can, but don’t go too far. That is a hard concept and very gray. But if you get it, you get into the top 4 around here in terms of interns.

The last intern that made it into the top 2 now works for us full time. He has done so for nearly 4 years now. When you find a good one, homegrown and all, keep them close as long as it is good for all. In the time since we hired him, he has proven what we believed to be true after his first week – he makes us a better organization.

If you have not guessed it yet, today is the last day for our latest intern, Christian Rusli, who has made it into the top 2 interns of all time at bk. He integrated well into our little clique, as well as excelling at his work. To do both is not easy. He leaves with the respect of an office full of long time advertising and marketing professionals. To say we are grizzled and jaded at the edges is a true statement. That said, we all believe in our work and our collaboration. To become a useful part of that, even for a short time and at the fringe, is saying something.

If you are wondering if we plan to hire Christian, the answer is a firm “No.” You see, Christian is only a freshman going into college. I was not thrilled with the idea of hiring someone so young, thinking he would be unable to integrate into our office. So after a full summer, Christian has taught me something about a book and its cover and all that. I now believe that it is not the age and often not even the experience that can make a successful internship. Instead, it is work ethic and a desire to become a useful member of the team.

Good luck at the University of Texas, Christian. (Go ‘Horns!)

Sincerely,

Your colleagues at bloomfield knoble.


 About The Author

clark-bachelot-headshotEric J. Hirschhorn is a principal at bloomfield knoble. For 17 years he has helped lead the Dallas-based advertising agency from start up to becoming a premier, full-service agency whose clients include some of the most influential companies in America. Eric lives to spend time with his family, to work and to travel the world in search of unique fishing adventures.

Connect With Eric Hirschhorn
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

 

05 Aug 2014
Gravity

Social Media Gravity

As if the social media big bang had just happened last week, every few days, there’s an article or blog speculating about the next big thing.

GravityContrary to what most people believe, for something else big to emerge and thrive, there’s going to have to be a new watershed event in communication technology along the lines of the telephone, email and mobile phones. I’m not a tech genius, so I don’t know what the next social game-changer is going to be. For a layman like myself, that’s science fiction territory: brain-computer interface, holographic avatars and hover-boards.*

The fact is, most of these lists are compiled from the perspective that there’s still a yearning out there for some new social platform that the whole world will jump on. The flaw in that thinking is that the social media big bang was almost 20 years ago. For 10 years or so, the cosmic dust and gases swirled around and formed GeoCities, Friendster, AOL Instant Messenger and MySpace, but those were unstable bodies that dissipated relatively quickly.

Out of the chaos of the rapidly expanding social media universe emerged two stable bodies that persist to this day – Twitter and Facebook. Others have formed and maintained in the meantime – YouTube, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram, Foursquare – and smaller bodies continue to swirl in the outer orbit – SnapChat, Vine, Tumblr and Whisper come to mind. Some of these smaller bodies will be around in five years, some won’t.

It’s likely that Facebook and Twitter will both be around though. There’s not enough chaos in the space any more, and they’ve learned from their predecessors’ failures. Keep it simple (mostly), watch for trends in usage and adapt – but without changing too quickly.

Never mind that every incremental change to the Facebook or Twitter profile page or newsfeed results in a user uprising threatening to jump ship. Where are they going to go? Google+ is out there, but that would be like colonizing Neptune. Who really wants to make that trip?

Elsewhere, like pulsars on the edge of the social media universe, apps are released daily that aim to cash in on some niche need and catch fire. They may shine bright for a few weeks or months, but then disappear.

It’s one thing to exist, but it’s another to sustain life. In the social media universe, that’s monetization. By far, Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn have the most breathable atmosphere for making money. Twitter has habitable zones, but has some work to do. The others range from gas giant to rocky proto planet.

Really, the question shouldn’t be “what’s the next big thing in social media?” For the time being, it’s the things that are here. The better question is, what’s the next little thing in social media?

Like moons orbiting a larger body, most of the up-and-coming social media platforms rely on the big boys to provide enough gravitational pull to keep them from floating off into the inky blackness of space.tumblr_mml4jcxE7a1r3kmkso1_500

To wit: I wouldn’t use Foursquare (er… Swarm) if it didn’t update Twitter for me. Nobody would ever see the awesome YouTube video of my dog catching a ball if I didn’t post it to Facebook. And of course Vine and Instagram really only exist as outliers of their parent companies – Twitter and Facebook.

But it’s not really as much fun to speculate about the next little thing, is it?

The thing is, the big things are already here, and hoping for something to come along and replace them is like hoping for the Death Star to show up and create a new asteroid field out of them.

For most businesses, this means a focus on what works and what’s stable. There’s no sense in immediately tethering yourself to the app your kid just downloaded so that you get in on the ground floor.

At bloomfield knoble, we watch these trends and identify them and any possible business use so that our clients don’t spin off into space like Sandra Bullock at the beginning of Gravity. So until we’re all holographic avatars with nano-links to the Internet generated by our universal mainframe-uploaded brain, I think we’re seeing a stable orbit of social media “big things.”

Keep that in mind the next time you see one of those blogs.

 

*HUVr is a hoax

 

 About The Author

jeff-carrington-headshot

Thanks to the shortening of attention spans and his inability to finish a novel (phenomena that are unrelated, he assures us), Jeff Carrington has found the perfect job for himself as director of communications and social media at bloomfield knoble. When he’s not developing social strategies for clients in 140 characters or less, he’s tweeting about dive bars and dog parks, both of which he frequents with his Spitz-Terrier mix buddy, Ben, and other random humans.
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.