Category: bk Life

30 May 2018
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Lynne McLean is committed to helping abused children in Texas

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Lynne McLean has dedicated her life and career to helping children who have been victims of abuse or neglect. She started her career on the front lines with abused and neglected kids as a Child Protective Service (CPS) caseworker in Dallas. A graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington, she has put her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in social work to good use over the last 37 years while working in public service. Lynne is currently the CEO of the Children’s Advocacy Center of Collin County (CACCC).

cac_logo-2017Lynne and I met a couple years ago when I first toured the Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC), then worked together on the board of directors for the CACCC. Since then, I have had the pleasure of knowing, respecting and personally liking Lynne. Having been with the CACCC for almost 10 years, she leads an amazing group of dedicated individuals all committed to assisting 100 percent of the kids who need their services in Collin County, Texas.

It’s interesting to note: in the last dozen years, the joint-service team, which includes forensic interviewers, family advocates, Child Protective Services, the district attorney’s office, therapists and the police, has accomplished some stunning statistics:

  • 100 percent of victims of child abuse and neglect in Collin County are offered services
  • 98 percent conviction rate of child abusers in Collin County
  • 24,185 prison years and 102 life sentences for abusers
  • Services provided for more that 3,500 children & non-offending family members each year
  • 14,000 therapy services provide annually
  • 10,000 children and 2,000 adults receive prevention education each year

 

Bringing safety, healing and justice to Collin County is a team effort by the CACCC. bloomfield knoble supports their initiatives through our own creative marketing and advertising skills. Our work assisted in their successful 2018 Gala, bringing awareness and information to the residents of the county.

Luann Boggs (Q): What does the CACCC do? How do they fill the void in the government services for abused and neglected children?

Lynne McLean (LM): “Each year, more than 5,000 reports of abuse or neglect are made here in Collin County. We provide critical services for children victimized by abuse or neglect in our community, free of charge. The CAC is the only agency in Collin County offering the needed services for these children under one roof and we do so because our community’s children deserve the best childhood possible.”

Please view the video bk produced for the CACCC 2018 Gala for more information about the amazing work the CACCC provides for children.

Q: What is the mission of the CACCC?

LM: “Our mission is to provide safety, healing and justice for all children victimized by abuse or neglect in our community.”

Q: How many full-time employees does the CACCC have? Who fits into this category of employees?

LM: “Forty-nine employees that are non-government employees such as forensic interviewers, therapists, administrative staff, family advocates, community relations and education staff and child care specialists.”

Q: Who are in the local and state government employees who are housed with you at the Advocacy Center? How many are on-site?

LM: “There are an additional 175 people who help abused children in such roles as: Child Protection Services caseworkers, police, lawyers in the district attorney’s office and physicians.”

Q: How many volunteers do you average working with the center in a year?

LM: “450 each year”

Q: Do you need more volunteers? What would they do?

LM: “There are so many ways the community can get involved. Such as: 1. Fundraising done through corporate or home events or community drives, helping with our big fundraising events like the Gala, Teddy Bear Ride and Healing Hearts Golf Tournament.

  1. Something thoughtful for the staff is always appreciated; our staff sees some of the saddest cases of abuse against children daily, so knowing that the community values them is huge. It really gives them a boost.
  2. Do a neighborhood or company drive to help in any number of ways, such as raising funds or supplies for the Rainbow Room, Back to School event and food and snacks for therapy sessions.
  3. Work in the Rainbow Room – the emergency supplies children and families need if they are relocated out of their home – by organizing items or, really, importantly, conducting drives for the Rainbow Room for new clothes, health and beauty aids, new shoes, school supplies and back packs.
  4. Work the Back to School event by conducting a drive for school supplies for the event.
  5. Volunteer in the child care area for siblings of abused children. We always need help there. Only specially trained staff work with the kids impacted by abuse.
  6. Offer to do volunteer administrative work. Our staff is very lean in order to spend our funds on the children.”

Q: How can people get involved?

LM: “Go to our website where you can find ideas and contact information: http://www.caccollincounty.org/get-involved/

Q: Let’s talk about you and your role with the CACCC. What do you find rewarding in your job?

LM: “The power in the work we do to actually change the lives of children in a positive way. It’s a privilege to get to do this work everyday. I find the staff at the Children’s Advocacy Center so inspiring; they step up everyday to do heartbreaking work. And there is hope: kids and families do get better and it’s so rewarding to see that happen.”

Q: What do you find challenging in your job?

LM: “There is so much to this job that it’s always a challenge to see that the right amount of attention is paid to all aspects of the organization.”

Q: What accomplishments at the CAC are you most proud of?

LM: “The fact that the CAC of Collin County offers therapy for life. We start with abused children and help them break that cycle of abuse, so that they can be safe parents for their own children. We have kids who receive therapy as children, then return when they begin dating or get married and then again when they begin their own families. By providing support for these kids as they reach adulthood, we are hopeful that we are breaking the cycle of abuse.  Nothing would make me happier than being put out of business because there is no more need for our services.

I am also proud of the fact that 100 percent of abused and neglected children in Collin County have the opportunity for the healing services we provide.

Another important part of our organization is the CAC Wellness Committee – this has been a surprising and really helpful project for the employees of the CAC. It’s a group that has done interesting and healthy things to help the staff that deals with healing children who’ve had horrific experiences. We’ve done fun things like yoga sessions, healthy food potlucks and classes on dealing with stress relief. Helping keep our staff healthy helps them better provide much needed services for the children.”

Q: What does the future hold for CACCC?

LM: “What keeps me up at night is the thinking about keeping up with the growth in Collin County and ensuring that NO CHILD is turned away because we don’t have the funds to help them. In order to do that we need to do three things:

  1. Stay abreast of new trends in managing abused and exploited children
  2. Ensuring that we stop the child trafficking that happens right now, and those kids fly under the radar in terms of seeking help
  3. Fighting child abuse that starts with cybercrime”

caccc-building
Q: What do you wish people knew about the CAC?

LM: “All cases in Collin County start at the Advocacy Center. We are a one-door-all-services-for-life center!”

Q: Let’s talk about how this job has impacted you personally. What surprised you about CACCC when you took the job as CEO?

LM: “How connected everybody is in Collin County. It’s a really surprising thing coming from the Dallas market. It’s an incredibly supportive county, with many of the same people who support our center also supporting the arts. It means that, in Collin County, the residents care about the entire community. That’s pretty unusual.”

Q: What do you wish people knew about you?

LM: “I am concerned about every case that walks through the door. And that even after 37 years in this business, some cases still bring me to tears. I am still surprised by how badly people can treat children. And the day that I don’t feel like crying for these children is the day I need to leave. Everyone associated with the CACCC feels the pain of the abused children in our community.”

Q: What advice would you give someone who wishes to move his or her career towards a CEO position at an advocacy center?

LM: “I guess I would tell anyone interested these things:

  1. Start your career on the front line.
  2. Become the best in each job you do.
  3. Pay attention to the good leaders and learn from them. Also pay attention to and learn from the bad supervisors. You will have some.
  4. Take extra responsibilities every step of the way.
  5. Follow through with anything you start, or let people know if you can’t deliver and why.
  6. Learn the balance of life between work and personal life.
  7. Build a network of supporters
  8. Continue to pursue personal balance throughout your career. This is important to stay healthy.
  9. Pursue outside interests; find passions outside of work. The younger you are when you learn, this the healthier you will be and will not burn out in a business that often shows you the dark side of humanity.”

Q: You said pursuing your passion and having a life balance are important. What do you continue to pursue to maintain your work-life balance?

LM: “I recently decided to learn to play the piano. I’ve wanted to do so since I was a child. I’m not good at it, but I work at it and really enjoy the process of learning and improving. I also ensure that I spend time with my family and friends. Staying connected to loved ones helps me stay positive. These things help me maintain a healthy outlook as we work towards eliminating child abuse and neglect – one case at a time.”

I’d like to say “Thank you” to Lynne for sharing with me some highlights of the amazing work the Children’s Advocacy Center of Collin County provides, and how passionate she and the entire staff are about helping the children of Collin County, Texas.

 


About the Author

luann-boggs-headshot

Luann Boggs is the Vice President of Business Development for bloomfield knoble. She works with new and existing accounts as a liaison between client and creative. Her favorite part of the job is meeting and working with interesting and intelligent people. Her personal interests are family, friends, good books and travel including all 50 states and over 25 countries.
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

03 May 2018
dallas-film-festival_culture_050218_google

Here’s Why I’m Going to the 2018 DIFF This Weekend, and You Should, Too

Sometimes it’s not about work. To clarify, in this blog representing my company, work is important, but so is the work-life balance as an individual person, and as a team. I feel like the big projects can wear you out as a group; unwinding back to routine is hard, and sometimes even that can make us all exhausted.

For me, this is challenging, as my job is 80 percent detail and structure, 20 percent creative. I also tend to take on extra projects because I think I have the capacity, even if I don’t. Hyper-attention and dedication is embedded in my soul. This leads me to the point of this blog, which is that I am psyched about the Dallas International Film Festival. And if any of that sounds like you, you should be, too!

I’ve been living in Dallas now for about 2 years, yet I’ve run into a problem. When I get to spend time outside of work, I don’t want to read or write (sadly, because I do it all day) and being physically adventurous is not something I enjoy on the whole. I’m not a homebody, but I love movies and music and typically spend my time at home watching Netflix or listening to records. If I go anywhere, it’s to see a movie or listen to / watch live performances. I feel like all my friends and I do is watch the same movies we’ve always seen and get at the same restaurants that are nearby and moderately priced.

So when my coworkers here at bk began to talk about the Dallas Film Society and the Dallas International Film Festival – partly because they love to go each year, and partly because we got to do some commercial spots for the event itself – I was elated! It’s an annual 8-day festival that celebrates the wonderment of movies as a cultural phenomenon that starts tonight, so I don’t even have to wait for it.

First off, the commercials turned out awesome (Check these out!).

Second, something that combines film and light social interaction with my friends and coworkers seems right up my alley. This gives me something new to do, somewhere to go, and something that actually sounds interesting to me! In fact, I was checking out their list of films and here’s a list of a few random things that caught my eye:

  • Bo Burham, a rising comedian who focuses on introspection, is listed as a director. I mean, when? What? I must know what his directive style is.
  • A short film that stars Nancy from Stranger Things. Her real name is Natalie Dyer.
  • Harvey, the black and white 1950s move about the 6-ft rabbit that only one guy can see.
  • Hair Wolf, that has the following intriguing description: “In a black hair salon in gentrifying Brooklyn, the local residents fend off a strange new monster.”
  • And June, the story of “An immigrant Chinese wife tries to fit in at her husband’s graduation reception in 1950s America.”

There’s also political films, Texas-based films and several cultural films. As well as the big premieres: Shock and Awe, the 25th anniversary screening of Jurassic Park, and the 40th anniversary screening of Animal House.

It’s time to get us out of our ruts and go to the festival – grab your team (or any day, really, because it’s 8 days in a row!) You can buy tickets to see specific movies for about as much as you’d spend at a theater, so you can pick what you want and leave the rest. Or make this the week to remember for 2018 by getting passes and going to the premiers, parties and drinking from the open bar in the filmmakers lounge.

 


About the Author

amanda-lovewell-headshot

Amanda Lovewell is a copyeditor for bloomfield knoble. She works to keep the brand voice intact for us, and for our clients. She lives for any form of artistic expression, especially music. One day, she would love to travel creating short stories about her misadventures.

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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

01 Dec 2016

Fighting the battle against mediocrity

Complacency is the greatest danger to an advertising agency and its clients

It happens to everyone and everything, everywhere. Monkeys in the forests of South America get complacent about their jumps between trees in the jungle and fall to their deaths. (Check it out, it is a real thing.) The New York Yankees get tired of winning and think it comes easy if you have the money. Marriages fail daily due to complacency. Businesses, too, lose the passion – and their customers, employees and products suffer. Advertising agencies are not immune to complacency. In fact, it is a prime destroyer of advertising agencies. Even this one is at risk.

bloomfield knoble feels Sisyphus’ pain.
bloomfield knoble feels Sisyphus’ pain.

For nearly two decades bloomfield knoble has fought against this sisyphean struggle to produce amazing creative, positioning, messaging and more to drive our clients’, and our own agency’s, success. Some historians argue that Rome fell due to complacency. This complacency, Historians argue, led the emperors to the hiring of mercenaries to win their wars to keep the empire expanding. That worked fine . . . until the mercenaries turned on their masters. All of this is to say, “it’s hard to keep the fire burning bright for a long time.” So what do we do when we start to feel it and see it affecting our work?

At bk, we try to stay ahead of it. Here are some of the tools we use in this epic struggle:

  1. Rotate talent – It’s important to NOT have “sameness.” That problem is not always solved by simply swapping internal creative talent on client projects. Therefore, we invite guest artists to come in and critique our work. This usually leads to some defensive statements by art directors. (That’s when we know it’s working.) We don’t use freelancers for start to finish work, but I believe it is a benefit to invite artists, strategists and other talent to come in and turn things over regularly. Sometimes we get them to start a thought process or challenge a belief. Amazing results come out of what can be a difficult, honest approach to solving complacency.
  2. Ask for client reviews at least twice yearly – Believe me, not everyone at your client’s office thinks you’re great. Someone has a negative opinion and it really helps to air that out. Better to know the issues, who is raising them, and deal with it head on. This keeps an agency from being blindsided with an agency review.
  3. Internal competition – My father did it to me and my brothers, so it must be good for business. Pick a favorite for a while and watch the jealousies drive the work. Parade around the bad stuff, ignore the good stuff and magic can happen. Or, bring in one of those outside artists for a week, not tell anyone what they are supposed to do, and watch the fire get lit.

  4. – Nah, that doesn’t work.
  5. Entire staff brainstorming – I mean the entire staff. Have a cleaning crew? Ask them to join in and add their thoughts. Just don’t make it the usual suspects. Don’t be surprised by how enlightening common sense statements from the least likely source can change a thought process.
  6. Fire a random staffer every 6-8 weeks. It’s kind of fun and keeps everyone wondering who’s next. It’s completely random, so it surprises people when we let one of our best designers go late on a Friday. Plus it keeps it stressful, which is good for morale. (They don’t have to like me. Only fear me.)*

So, that is how we battle complacency on behalf of our talented creatives and thoughtful thinkers and happy managers at the bloomfield knoble advertising agency offices.

But what about the partners and directors?

That is much more difficult to break. However, there is always a problem (or 50) to solve everyday. There is always new business that must be found. There is always somebody trying to screw you to the wall. Yes, those things kind of keep complacency at bay for that segment of the agency. I think the term for that is “burnout.”

So, I guess there is not much complacency for partners and directors. We are covered in so much sh_t and sewage we don’t have time to get bored. Wait, what am I writing about . . . Moreover, do I even care?

(*Number 6 on this list was just my way of keeping you awake and not complacent with my blog. Guess I should have added “shock value” to the list.)

 


About the Author

eric-hirschhorn-headshotEric J. Hirschhorn is a principal at bloomfield knoble. For 17 years he has helped lead the Dallas-based advertising agency from start up to becoming a premier, full-service agency whose clients include some of the most influential companies in America. Eric lives to spend time with his family, to work and to travel the world in search of unique fishing adventures.

Connect with Eric Hirschhorn
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

01 Nov 2016
2016-07-16-13-23-24-225x300

Turns out Tweens are, well, different.

The next generation of consumer is even more different than you think.

My 11 year-old son makes me insane. Don’t get me wrong, I love him more than anything, but after watching him walk around with a trash can on his head the other day, I’m starting to think that maybe . . . just maybe . . . there is something wrong with him.

Fortunately, I’m lucky enough to have unrestricted access to a cognitive neuroscientist – his grandmother.

I was quickly (a) assured that there is nothing wrong with my son; (b) that I was way worse in terms of making my parents insane; and (c) that, duh, he’s a kid.

Quick side note – people here at bloomfield knoble know that I have a tendency to explain Hawking / Einstein when asked, “what time is it?” Well, if you think I’m bad, you should meet my Mom. Here’s what I learned about Tweens and early Teens: Adolescence is a period of human brain growth and that from about 12 until 14 the brain’s cortex layers thin down probably as a result of pruning out unwanted connections between neurons, while important neurons gain a sheath that helps transmit signals more quickly. I was directed to a recent paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America titled, “Adolescence is associated with genetically patterned consolidation of the hubs of the human brain connectome.”

While I am more familiar with physics than biology, I thought I would take a look and uncover the mystery of youth. I was kind of excited, not just because I would like to figure out what is going on inside my son’s brain, but also because we at bloomfield knoble have had the opportunity to work on many projects that involve marketing to the parents of children. Let’s be honest about our industry – it’s not just advertising to the parent, it’s also getting the child excited about the product enough to help encourage the parent to make a purchase. So I’m pretty confident that this new research could really help us better understand the next generation of purchaser and position us as an agency to get ahead of the curve.

I made it through the abstract.

How does human brain structure mature during adolescence? We used MRI to measure cortical thickness and intracortical myelination in 297 population volunteers aged 14–24 y old. We found and replicated that association cortical areas were thicker and less myelinated than primary cortical areas at 14 y. However, association cortex had faster rates of shrinkage and myelination over the course of adolescence. Age-related increases in cortical myelination were maximized approximately at the internal layer of projection neurons. Adolescent cortical myelination and shrinkage were coupled and specifically associated with a dorsoventrally patterned gene expression profile enriched for synaptic, oligodendroglial- and schizophrenia-related genes. Topologically efficient and biologically expensive hubs of the brain anatomical network had greater rates of shrinkage/myelination and were associated with overexpression of the same transcriptional profile as cortical consolidation. We conclude that normative human brain maturation involves a genetically patterned process of consolidating anatomical network hubs. We argue that developmental variation of this consolidation process may be relevant both to normal cognitive and behavioral changes and the high incidence of schizophrenia during human brain adolescence.

So I called my Mom back, who, having heard from me twice in the same week presumed that something was terribly wrong, to ask for a summary of the report. It turns out that kids are different. Not just different, but different. As in, their brains aren’t like ours. Playing – even if it seems pretty nonsensical to adults – is training their brain to process information. Lack of focus is the brain creating pathways to different files that form foundations for future reasoning. Doing stuff that seems, well, stupid, is just a part of growing up. What we, as adults, perceive as a lack of common sense, is really just the brain shedding – or adding – layers of information.

I asked my Mom about ways that we, as an agency, could better market to Tweens. She chuckled (or snorted, either way it was a verbal dismissive gesture) and said that while market research may generate some observable results, the simple truth is that adults no longer know how to relate to kids that age – our brains simply don’t work like that anymore. Furthermore, asking a kid to come up with an ad for kids doesn’t work so well either, because it forces them to process information differently. In other words, asking a kid to come up with an ad will get the kid to stop acting like a kid and start thinking (or trying to think) like an adult who is problem solving. My Mom said that the best examples of success in her trials had always been to watch kids at play and observe. Enough observation may reveal certain patterns of behavior that could be used to identify opportunities for engagement.

I decided to give it a try – rather than let my son make me insane, I decided just to observe and try to identify a pattern that we could use on our next project. That lasted about 20 seconds because my kid declared himself a human Nerf gun and shot a dart out of his nose.

I think we’ll just avoid marketing to children in the future.

 


About the Author

thomas-thompson-headshot

A STEM (Science / Technology / Engineering / Math) graduate and COO of bloomfield knoble, Thomas exemplifies the view that advertising is becoming an engineering discipline. He leads the integrated insights and strategic planning group in a way consistent with bloomfield knoble’s goal of bringing a strong analytical foundation to uncover fresh and innovative insights and business opportunities.
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

15 Dec 2015
austin-featured

Southbound 'Thirty-Five'

2015 has been quite a busy year, one that has brought about a number of changes for both bloomfield knoble and myself. Most notably, I was recently afforded the opportunity to become somewhat of a conquistador, planting the orange bk flag in a new center for emerging ideas, creative ventures and business prosperity…

Untitled

In September, bk officially opened its doors in Austin, bringing the same unique and effective marketing solutions we have practiced for years in Dallas a bit closer to the Heart of Texas! Considered a hub for inspiration and innovation, Austin provides an excellent opportunity for bk and myself to grow and provide even greater service to our existing and soon-to-be Austin clients.

While a new city brings new horizons, it brings even more opportunities to be better. At bk, we’re always striving for better. So if you’re ever in Austin, drop us a line—we’re just around the corner, happy and willing to help.


 About The Author

andy-edwards-headshot

Andy Edwards is an Associate Art Director with bloomfield knoble. His interests include shredding on the guitar, pumping iron and, of course, beer. At bk, he is the wearer of many “hats” (figuratively, not literally, of course), in which he especially contributes his creative eye to design and video production. The Force is strong with him.
Connect With Andy Edwards
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# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

15 Dec 2015
austin-featured

Southbound ‘Thirty-Five’

2015 has been quite a busy year, one that has brought about a number of changes for both bloomfield knoble and myself. Most notably, I was recently afforded the opportunity to become somewhat of a conquistador, planting the orange bk flag in a new center for emerging ideas, creative ventures and business prosperity…

Untitled

In September, bk officially opened its doors in Austin, bringing the same unique and effective marketing solutions we have practiced for years in Dallas a bit closer to the Heart of Texas! Considered a hub for inspiration and innovation, Austin provides an excellent opportunity for bk and myself to grow and provide even greater service to our existing and soon-to-be Austin clients.

While a new city brings new horizons, it brings even more opportunities to be better. At bk, we’re always striving for better. So if you’re ever in Austin, drop us a line—we’re just around the corner, happy and willing to help.


 About The Author

andy-edwards-headshot

Andy Edwards is an Associate Art Director with bloomfield knoble. His interests include shredding on the guitar, pumping iron and, of course, beer. At bk, he is the wearer of many “hats” (figuratively, not literally, of course), in which he especially contributes his creative eye to design and video production. The Force is strong with him.
Connect With Andy Edwards
twitter
facebooklinkedin_25x25youtube_25X25

# # #

Who is bloomfield knoble?

bloomfield knoble is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bloomfield knoble provides a one-to-one approach. Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at 214-254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.