Category: Tips & Tricks

20 Aug 2018
radio-blog_google

3 Reasons to Try Radio Advertising in DFW

As I sat stuck in stop-start traffic on switch from 183 East to the Turnpike this morning, I was reminded of the power of advertising. Here I was, switching back and forth on my preset channels, looking for a morning rush talk show that I like. What was marked as a 20-minute commute on my phone was suddenly a 45-minute frustration.

Image result for dallas traffic

Now, I’m never really one to plan my meals; I tend to let my mood decide or just skip lunch all together. However, I was quickly persuaded to get a sandwich today, as Subway, a favorite of mine (that I completely forgot about for some reason), played a simple commercial while I stared at the tail lights in front of me.

This small act made me think—maybe there’s something to radio advertising that’s worth talking about. Perhaps this seemingly old-fashion, slightly intimidating medium isn’t so removed after all, and, in fact, could really benefit your business specially if your audience lives or works in Dallas / Fort Worth.

  • Your customers are always driving [and probably stuck in traffic]

Whether your target audience is C-level executives, college students or stay-at-home parents, they’ll spend some time driving. The INRIX 2017 Global Traffic Scorecard reports that Dallas drivers each spent an average of 54 hours of last year stuck in traffic (about 6%), ranking Dallas as one of the top 30 global cities that has high traffic congestion. As maddening as that is, it couldn’t feel more accurate. Does this mean that your customers listen to the AM/FM radio while in their car? With this fact alone, probably not, but you have already increased your reach out of shear probability.

  • DFW has a huge music scene that utilizes the radio

Between live music at restaurants or festivals and concerts at the American Airlines Center, it’s obvious that DFW is a place of music lovers. How does this help you? According to a 2017 Nielsen State of the Media Report, AM/FM radio reaches more Americans each week than any other platform (including phones and television). This means that, with a strong strategy that focuses on your target audience and their preference in music, you can create a planned approach to appeal to your local customers.

  • Your customers may need a medium changeup

If your print and video campaigns seem to fall short, it could be an issue with impact. While we work within the average attention span of eight seconds, it may be harder than you realize to make an impression. In 2017, the IE School of Human Sciences & Technology (via the American Marketing Association) conducted studies showing that “the average consumer is exposed to up to 10,000 brand messages a day.” What’s more, “consumers switch screens up to 21 times an hour.” That’s a lot of information to take in visually.

In this case, the Radio Advertising Bureau infers that radio can be used as additional medium to your regular channels, as a form of recency (or brand reminders). This small form of reinforcement can boost your reach and presence, so they’ll be reminded of you when they need your product or services. The concept is exactly how the Subway advertisement quietly persuaded me to have a sandwich for lunch today.

Where do you start?

Our team can help you identify who specifically are your customers and their needs. Once we know your advertising goals, we can strategize with you to make the most of your radio advertisements. Check out our services.

Photo credit: The Dallas Morning News

 


About the Author

amanda-lovewell-headshot

Amanda Lovewell is a copyeditor for bloomfield knoble. She works to keep the brand voice intact for us, and for our clients. She lives for any form of artistic expression, especially music. One day, she would love to travel creating short stories about her misadventures.

Connect with Amanda Lovewell
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

01 Dec 2016

Fighting the battle against mediocrity

Complacency is the greatest danger to an advertising agency and its clients

It happens to everyone and everything, everywhere. Monkeys in the forests of South America get complacent about their jumps between trees in the jungle and fall to their deaths. (Check it out, it is a real thing.) The New York Yankees get tired of winning and think it comes easy if you have the money. Marriages fail daily due to complacency. Businesses, too, lose the passion – and their customers, employees and products suffer. Advertising agencies are not immune to complacency. In fact, it is a prime destroyer of advertising agencies. Even this one is at risk.

bloomfield knoble feels Sisyphus’ pain.
bloomfield knoble feels Sisyphus’ pain.

For nearly two decades bloomfield knoble has fought against this sisyphean struggle to produce amazing creative, positioning, messaging and more to drive our clients’, and our own agency’s, success. Some historians argue that Rome fell due to complacency. This complacency, Historians argue, led the emperors to the hiring of mercenaries to win their wars to keep the empire expanding. That worked fine . . . until the mercenaries turned on their masters. All of this is to say, “it’s hard to keep the fire burning bright for a long time.” So what do we do when we start to feel it and see it affecting our work?

At bk, we try to stay ahead of it. Here are some of the tools we use in this epic struggle:

  1. Rotate talent – It’s important to NOT have “sameness.” That problem is not always solved by simply swapping internal creative talent on client projects. Therefore, we invite guest artists to come in and critique our work. This usually leads to some defensive statements by art directors. (That’s when we know it’s working.) We don’t use freelancers for start to finish work, but I believe it is a benefit to invite artists, strategists and other talent to come in and turn things over regularly. Sometimes we get them to start a thought process or challenge a belief. Amazing results come out of what can be a difficult, honest approach to solving complacency.
  2. Ask for client reviews at least twice yearly – Believe me, not everyone at your client’s office thinks you’re great. Someone has a negative opinion and it really helps to air that out. Better to know the issues, who is raising them, and deal with it head on. This keeps an agency from being blindsided with an agency review.
  3. Internal competition – My father did it to me and my brothers, so it must be good for business. Pick a favorite for a while and watch the jealousies drive the work. Parade around the bad stuff, ignore the good stuff and magic can happen. Or, bring in one of those outside artists for a week, not tell anyone what they are supposed to do, and watch the fire get lit.

  4. – Nah, that doesn’t work.
  5. Entire staff brainstorming – I mean the entire staff. Have a cleaning crew? Ask them to join in and add their thoughts. Just don’t make it the usual suspects. Don’t be surprised by how enlightening common sense statements from the least likely source can change a thought process.
  6. Fire a random staffer every 6-8 weeks. It’s kind of fun and keeps everyone wondering who’s next. It’s completely random, so it surprises people when we let one of our best designers go late on a Friday. Plus it keeps it stressful, which is good for morale. (They don’t have to like me. Only fear me.)*

So, that is how we battle complacency on behalf of our talented creatives and thoughtful thinkers and happy managers at the bloomfield knoble advertising agency offices.

But what about the partners and directors?

That is much more difficult to break. However, there is always a problem (or 50) to solve everyday. There is always new business that must be found. There is always somebody trying to screw you to the wall. Yes, those things kind of keep complacency at bay for that segment of the agency. I think the term for that is “burnout.”

So, I guess there is not much complacency for partners and directors. We are covered in so much sh_t and sewage we don’t have time to get bored. Wait, what am I writing about . . . Moreover, do I even care?

(*Number 6 on this list was just my way of keeping you awake and not complacent with my blog. Guess I should have added “shock value” to the list.)

 


About the Author

eric-hirschhorn-headshotEric J. Hirschhorn is a principal at bloomfield knoble. For 17 years he has helped lead the Dallas-based advertising agency from start up to becoming a premier, full-service agency whose clients include some of the most influential companies in America. Eric lives to spend time with his family, to work and to travel the world in search of unique fishing adventures.

Connect with Eric Hirschhorn
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

01 Sep 2016
panda-img

Browser extension…look like a Panda

Check out this content aggregator for design inspiration and creative industry news

panda

One of my absolute favorite internet browser extensions has to be the Panda plug-in. Panda, as it’s known, is a widget that displays design-specific content as the default page when opening a new tab in your browser. The widget is semi-customizable, in which you can pick and choose from various layouts and sources of aggregated design content from all over the web, ranging from news feeds of creative publications to tiles of user-submitted artwork.

Not only does it dish out the low-down on the industry’s trending topics, but it also provides an environment where contributors can showcase their skills and exchange ideas and techniques. As a creative myself, it’s nice to have a constant source of relative inspiration and news regarding the industry of design today. It’s an easy way to browse through a wide variety of artistic styles.

To download the Panda plug-in/extension, follow these links:


About the Author

andy-edwards-headshot

Andy Edwards is Director of Digital Services at bloomfield knoble. He possesses the hybrid skills of a strategic business executive and a creative, problem-solving designer; someone who is a catalyst for transformation and the agent of cultural change.
Connect with Andy Edwards
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Who is bloomfield knoble?

bk is a full-service, premier strategic marketing and advertising agency based in Dallas, Texas. Our clients include top 50 Fortune companies and unique businesses that seek a strategic partner to empower their offerings and growth. Whether developing an integrated advertising campaign, a direct marketing tactical approach, brand framework and positioning exercise, or daily creative, technical and consulting support, bk provides a one-to-one approach.

Call Eric Hirschhorn to learn more at (214) 254-3805, or eric@bloomweb.com.

30 Jul 2014

Cool video post

One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armour-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections. The bedding was hardly able to cover it and seemed ready to slide off any moment. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. “What’s happened to me?” he thought. It wasn’t a dream. His room, a proper human room although a little too small, lay peacefully between its four familiar walls.

A collection of textile samples lay spread out on the table – Samsa was a travelling salesman – and above it there hung a picture that he had recently cut out of an illustrated magazine and housed in a nice, gilded frame. It showed a lady fitted out with a fur hat and fur boa who sat upright, raising a heavy fur muff that covered the whole of her lower arm towards the viewer. Gregor then turned to look out the window at the dull weather.

A collection of textile samples lay spread out on the table – Samsa was a travelling salesman and above it there hung a picture that he had recently cut out of an illustrated magazine and housed in a nice, gilded frame.By Some Thinker

One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armour-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections. The bedding was hardly able to cover it and seemed ready to slide off any moment. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. “What’s happened to me?” he thought. It wasn’t a dream. His room, a proper human room although a little too small, lay peacefully between its four familiar walls.

29 Jul 2014

Ultra Amazing One

No Fancy Content

The bedding was hardly able to cover it and seemed ready to slide off any moment. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. “What’s happened to me?” he thought. It wasn’t a dream. His room, a proper human room although a little too small, lay peacefully between its four familiar walls. A collection of textile samples lay spread out on the table – Samsa was a travelling salesman – and above it there hung a picture that he had recently cut out of an illustrated magazine and housed in a nice, gilded frame. It showed a lady fitted out with a fur hat and fur boa who sat upright, raising a heavy fur muff that covered the whole of her lower arm towards the viewer. Gregor then turned to look out the window at the dull weather.

The Plot

One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armour-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections. One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin.

The Jungle

One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armour-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections. One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin.

[button style=”light” size=”large” href=”https://player.vimeo.com/video/68732853″ label=”Watch Video” el_class=”fancybox fancybox.iframe”]

30 May 2014

Duplicating things

One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armour-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections. The bedding was hardly able to cover it and seemed ready to slide off any moment. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. “What’s happened to me?” he thought. It wasn’t a dream. His room, a proper human room although a little too small, lay peacefully between its four familiar walls.

A collection of textile samples lay spread out on the table – Samsa was a travelling salesman – and above it there hung a picture that he had recently cut out of an illustrated magazine and housed in a nice, gilded frame. It showed a lady fitted out with a fur hat and fur boa who sat upright, raising a heavy fur muff that covered the whole of her lower arm towards the viewer. Gregor then turned to look out the window at the dull weather.

A collection of textile samples lay spread out on the table – Samsa was a travelling salesman and above it there hung a picture that he had recently cut out of an illustrated magazine and housed in a nice, gilded frame.By Some Thinker

One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armour-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections. The bedding was hardly able to cover it and seemed ready to slide off any moment. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. “What’s happened to me?” he thought. It wasn’t a dream. His room, a proper human room although a little too small, lay peacefully between its four familiar walls.